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St Pauls, Index

INDEX.


A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | O | P | R | S | T | V | W

(Note: The Page number is the link to the reference.
Pagex indicates that the reference is (only) in the Footnote).


  • Alfred, King, 26
  • Altars, 6, 55, 56
  • Anabaptists, 42
  • Archdeacons, 55
  • Architecture of Old St. Paul's, 3, 5, 67
  • Arthur, Prince of Wales, 36
  • Athelstan, 24
  • Augustine, 2
  • Aulus Plautius, 1
  • Ave Maria Lane, 9



[page 78]


  • Gardiner, Bishop of Winchester, 46
  • Garnet, the Jesuit, 50
  • Grafton, the Chronicler, 35
  • Gregory the Great, 2
  • Gregory VII., 27
  • Gregory IX., 29
  • Grey, Lady Jane, 39
  • Grey Friars, The, 44
  • Gualo, 28


  • Innocent III., 28
  • Innocent IV., 30


  • Kilwardby, Archbishop, 31
  • King, Dr. Henry, 69

  • Lanfranc, Archbishop, 3, 26
  • Langton, Archbishop, 28
  • Laud, Archbishop, 66
  • Laurentius, Archbishop of Canterbury, 2, 23
  • Leo X., 39
  • Lilly, William, 38, 39
  • Linacre, Thomas, 38, 39
  • Lincoln's Inn Chapel, 67
  • Lollards, The, 15, 34
  • Longchamp, William de, 27
  • Longman's Three Cathedrals, 8
  • Lucius, King, 2
  • Ludgate Hill, 9
  • Luther, 39, 40
  • Lydgate, 10, 62



  • Papal Legates, 28, 29, 41, 46
  • Pardon Churchyard, The, 10, 11, 44
  • Parentalia, Wren's, 8
  • Paris, Matthew, 4
  • Parr, Catherine, 19
  • Parr, Anne, 19
  • Paternoster Row, 9, 12
  • Paul's Chain, 10
  • Paul's Cross, 11, 27, 42, 68
  • Paul's Walk, 8, 13, 65
  • Pepys' account of the Fire, 72
  • Philip IV. of France, 31
  • Philip IV. of Spain, 46
  • Pickerill, Richard, 7
  • Pilkington, Bishop of Durham, 50
  • Popes, Pretensions of the, 28-31
  • Pindar, Sir Paul, 67
  • Pole, Cardinal, 46, 48
  • Porter, John, 43
  • Prebendaries, 53
  • Precincts, The, 9-12

  • Redford, John, 61
  • Reformation, 42-49
  • Rich, Edmund, Archbishop of Canterbury, 29
  • Richard, Duke of York, 35
  • Richard II., 15, 16, 34
  • Richard III., 36
  • Rogers, John, 48
  • Roman Churches, 2
  • Romans in London, 1, 2
  • Rusthall, Bishop of Durham, 40

  • Sacrist, The, 54
  • Sancroft, Archbishop, 71, 74
  • St. Alban's Abbey, 13, 35
  • St. Albans, Battle of, 35
  • St. Edmund, 6, 24, 62
  • St. Ethelburga, 24
  • St. Faith's Church, 5, 11, 72
  • St. Gregory-by-St. Paul, 5, 12, 68
  • St. Katharine Cree, 8
  • St. Martin's, Ludgate Hill, 9, 49
  • St. Mary-le-Bow, 28
  • St. Michael Querne, 32
  • St. Osyth, Monastery of, 4
  • St, Paul's Cathedral, the Anglo-Saxon Church, 3, 22.
    • The second Cathedral, see 'Old St. Paul's.'
  • St. Paul's School, 4, 38, 72[page 80]
  • St. Peter's, Cornhill, 32
  • St. Thomas Acons, 32
  • Sebba, 16, 24, Plate 16
  • Sebert, 2, 23
  • Services, 60
  • Skelton, 41
  • Simon de Montfort, 30
  • Somerset, The Protector, 44, 45
  • Spurriers' Lane, 10
  • Stapylton, Bishop of Exeter, 31
  • Statute of Provisors, The, 31
  • Stephen, King, 10
  • Sudbury, Archbishop, 34
  • Sweyn, 172
  • Swynford, Catherine, 18

  • Tallis, Thomas, 60
  • Tomkins, John, 71
  • Treasurer, The, 54
  • Three Cathedrals, Longman's, 7, 8


  • Wakefield, The Battle of, 35
  • Walton, Izaak, 69
  • Warham, Archbishop, 38, 39, 42
  • Warwick, The Earl of, 36
  • White, Lord Mayor, 46
  • White Friars, Church of the, 13
  • Whitsun Festivals, 32
  • Wilkins, Bishop, 71
  • William I., 3
  • Winchelsey, Archbishop, 30
  • Wolsey, Cardinal, 39, 40, 41
  • Wren, Sir Christopher, 8, 71, 75
  • Wyclif, John, 31, 33, 34
  • Wykeham, William of, 5, 33
  • Wyngaerde's drawing of London, 8








FOOTNOTES, CHAPTER I

[Footnote 1: On the site of this old tower, Archbishop Kilwardby afterwards built the house of the Dominicans, or "Black Friars."]

[Footnote 2: Hence old Fuller's racy witticism: "S. Paul's is truly the mother church, having one babe in her body, S. Faith, and another in her arms, S. Gregory."]

[Footnote 3: A pommel was a ball made of metal, from Lat., pomum: "an apple." It was not uncommon to surmount church spires with hollow vessels and to take note of their capability of holding. Sometimes they were made in form of a ship, especially near ports where corn was imported.]








FOOTNOTES, CHAPTER II

[Footnote 1: In old times the name Ludgate Hill was given to that part which ran up from the Fleet to the City Gate. Inside the Gate the street was called "Bowyer Row," from the trade carried on in it. But it was also frequently called "Paul's." Ludgate was pulled down in 1760, and then Ludgate Hill became the name of the whole street.]








FOOTNOTES, CHAPTER III

[Footnote 1: "Here lieth Sebba, King of the East Saxons, who was converted to the faith by Erkenwald, Bishop of London, in the year of Christ 677. A man much devoted to God, greatly occupied in religious acts, frequent prayers, and pious fruits of almsgiving, preferring a private and monastic life to all the riches and honours of the kingdom, who, when he had reigned 30 years, received the religious habit at the hands of Walther, Bishop of London, who succeeded the aforesaid Erkenwald, of whom the Venerable Bede makes mention in his History of the English People."]

[Footnote 2: "Here lieth Ethelred, King of the English, son of King Edgar, to whom, on the day of his hallowing, St. Dunstan, the archbishop, after placing the crown upon him, is said to have foretold terrible things in these words: Forasmuch as thou hast aspired to the Kingdom through the death of thy brother, against whom the English have conspired along with thy wretched mother, the sword shall not depart from thy house, raging against thee all the days of thy life, destroying thy seed until the day when thy Kingdom shall be conveyed to another Kingdom whose customs and language the race over whom thou rulest knoweth not; nor shall there be expiation save by long-continued penalty of the sin of thyself, of thy mother, and of those men who took part in that shameful deed. Which things came to pass even as that holy man foretold; for Ethelred being worn out and put to flight in many battles by Sweyn, King of the Danes, and his son Cnut, and at last, closely besieged in London, died miserably in the year of the Incarnation 1017, after a reign of 36 years of great tribulation."]








FOOTNOTES, CHAPTER IV

[Footnote 1:

"This humble tomb our citizens placed here
    Unequal to thy merits, father dear;
For London's people know how wisely thou
    Didst guide their fate, and gladly feel it now.
Under thy guidance freedom was restored,
    And noble gifts through thee on us were poured.
Riches and earthly honours cease to be,
    But thy good deeds abide in memory."]

[Footnote 2: See MediƦval London, p. 62.]

[Footnote 3: Page 25.]

[Footnote 4: There was a special order in the first year of Edward VI. that instead of this censing a sermon should be preached.]

[Footnote 5: It stood where the Peel statue now is, at the top of Cheapside.]



FOOTNOTES, CHAPTER V

[Footnote 1: The Grey Friars Monastery was on the site of Christ's Hospital, this year removed. The Chronicler was one of the expelled monks, and, naturally enough, was shocked at the whole business.]

[Footnote 2: Robert Machyn was an upholsterer of Queenhithe, whose business, however, was chiefly in the way of funerals. He kept a diary, which is much used by Strype in his Annals, but has been reprinted in full by the Camden Society. It is very amusing, very illiterate, and full of gossip. He was a hot partisan of the Roman faith, and so never loses the opportunity of a fling at the Reformers. He died of the plague in 1563.]

[Footnote 3: Milman's Annals of St. Paul's, pp. 280-1.]



FOOTNOTES, CHAPTER VI

κανων


FOOTNOTES, CHAPTER VII

[Footnote 1: There is a very amusing little book by one Henry Farley, written in 1621, on the subject of this visit. In one paper he personates the Cathedral, and expresses his rejoicing, "I have had more sweeping, brushing, and cleaning, than in forty years before. My workmen looke like him they call Muldsacke after sweeping of a chimney." An oil painting by Farley in the collection of the Society of Antiquaries, which we reproduce by permission, shows the houses built against the cathedral, and blackening it with wreaths of smoke, to which attention is drawn by this legend across the picture:—

Viewe, O King, howe my wall creepers
Have made mee work for chimney sweepers."]



And Last updated on: Monday, 07-Sep-2020 11:55:06 BST