Battle Bridge 1810
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Haunted London, Index

 

 


[Pg 467]

INDEX.

Abingdon, Mrs., “Nosegay Fan,” 318

Adam, the Brothers, their design, 96;
joke against their Scotch workmen, 103

Adam, Robert, death and funeral of, 104

Addison, the “Cato” of, 311;
Booth’s representation of “Cato,” ib.

Adelphi, site of the, 97;
the residence of Garrick, ib.;
Johnson and Boswell at, 98;
prowlers in its arches, 448

Adelphi Rooms, the, 449

Adelphi Theatre, first success of, 180;
Terry and Yates as its lessees, ib.;
appearance of “Jim Crow” in, ib.;
the elder Mathews manager of, ib.;
last great successes at, 185

Akenside, at Tom’s Coffee-house, 38

Albemarle, Duke of. See Monk

Albemarle, Duchess of, 93;
anecdotes of, 301

“All the Year Round,” 170

Ambassador, Spanish, attack of an anti-Catholic mob on his house, 277

Ambassadors, French and Spanish, affray between the retainers of, 134

Amiens, proclamation of peace of, 18

Anderson, Dr. Patrick, his Scotch pills, 53;
story of Sir Walter Scott relating to, ib.

Anne of Denmark, her masques and masquerades in Somerset House, 58;
accident at the funeral of, 195

Anstis, John, Garter King at Arms, 43

Antiquaries, Society of, 70

Apollo Court and Room, 6

Armstrong, Sir Thomas, 11

Arnold, Dr., and the Lyceum, 171

Art, English, institutions for promoting, 75

Arts, the Society of, its place of meeting, 99;
Barry’s paintings, 100, 449;
premiums and bounties distributed by, ib.;
Barry at work on its frescoes, 101;
foundation and object of, 449;
Barry’s application to, ib.

Artists’ Club in Clare Market, 346

Arundel House, Strand, 39;
occupants of, 40;
death of the Countess of Nottingham in, 41;
the Marquis of Rosney’s description of, ib.;
Thomas Howard’s treasures of art in, 42;
neglect of antiquities in, ib.;
rooms lent to the Royal Society in, 43;
streets erected on the site of, ib.;
Gay’s remarks on its glories, ib.

Arundel Street, Strand, its residents, 43, 164

Astronomical Society, 71

“Athenæum” (Newspaper), 170

Atterbury, Bishop, 155


Bacon, Lord, his ingratitude, 32;
birthplace of, 127;
events of his life connected with York House, 127-8;
anecdotes of his early life, 128;
verses addressed to him at Durham House, 129;
his early legal studies, 130

Balmerino, Lord, an anecdote of, 234

Baltimore, Lord, infamous conduct of, 176

Banks. See Coutts, Child, and Drummond

Bannister, Jack, 325

Barrow, Dr. Isaac, the death of, 232

Barry, his violence, 101;
his diligence at work, ib.;
his paintings in the Council Room of the Society of Arts, ib.;
effect produced by his paintings, 449;
his poverty and death, ib.

Barry, Mrs., her theatrical career, 433

Barry, Spanger, an actor, 315

Basing House, an adventure at, 279

Beard, singer and actor, 249

Beauclerk, Topham, 98

Beaufort, House, Strand, 83, 447

Beckett, Andrew, works of, 99

Beckett, Thomas, bookseller, 99

Bedford, the Earls of, the old town house of, 185;
streets named after his family, ib.

Bedford Street once fashionable, 186;
Half Moon Tavern in, ib.;
residents of, 187;
Constitution Tavern in, 197

Bedfordbury, 236, 459

Beefsteak Club, 172;
badge of, ib.;
members of, 173;
Peg Woffington, president of one at Dublin, ib.;
another started by Rich and Lambert, ib.;
its place of meeting, ib.;
distinguished members of, 454;
sale of its effects, 174

Bell, Mr. Jacob, 225
[Pg 468]
Bellamy, George Anne, actress, 317

Berkeley, Dr., 155

Bermudas, the Justice Overdo’s allusion to, 235

Berties, the, 417

Betterton, the “Garrick” of his age, 433;
the parts he represented, ib.;
his death, ib.

Betty, Master, 321

Billington, Mrs., 333

Bindley, James, father of the Society of Antiquaries, his burial-place, 164

Birch, Dr., the antiquary, 36;
his books and literary remains, 48;
Dr. Johnson’s remark on, ib.

Birkenhead, Sir John, 245

Bishop, operas produced by, 334

Black Jack, 348, 440

Blake, the mystical painter, 83

Blemund’s Ditch, 353

Bohemia, the Queen of, 293;
reports concerning, 295;
Sir Henry Wotton’s lines to, ib.;
memorial of her husband, 296

Boleyn, Anne, at Temple Bar, 21

Bonomi, 78

Booksellers, their shops the haunts of wits and poets, 219

Booth, Barton, 311

Boswell, James, admitted into the Literary Club, 17;
the supposed Shaksperean MSS., 47.

Bowl-yard, its name, 373

Boydell, Alderman, 258

Bracegirdle, Mrs., 49;
her abduction, 50;
her charity, 347;
her popularity, 434

Braham, John, 333

Bristol, Earl of, 264;
particulars concerning, 459

Britain’s Bourse. See Exchange

Brocklesby, Dr. Richard, friend of Burke and Johnson, 45;
attends Lord Chatham when he fainted in the House of Lords, ib.

Brougham, Lord, 396

Buckingham, the first Duke of, 130;
his residences, ib.;
patronage of art, 131;
Dryden’s lines on, 132;
Pope’s lines on, ib.;
Clarendon’s view of his character, 133

Buckingham, the second Duke of, 133

Buckingham Street, 135;
distinguished residents in, 136, 137;
Mr. David Copperfield’s visit to, 451

Bull’s Head, the, Clare Market, 346

Burgess, Dr., a witty preacher, 159;
successors of, ib.

Burleigh, Lord, his residence, 179

Burleigh Street, site of, 179

Burley, Sir Simon, 218

Burnet, Bishop, 44

Burton St. Lazar, 350

Bushnell, John, the sculptor, 7, 8

Butcher Row, 148;
Lee’s death in, 150


“Cabinet” Newspaper, see “Pic-Nic”

Caermarthan, Lord, 136

Cameron, Dr., burial place of, 120

Canary House, 452

Canning, George, 395

Carey Street, 428

Carlini, 65

Carlisle, the Countess of, 178

Catherine of Braganza, 61;
her return to Portugal, 62

Catherine Street, its newspapers and theatre in, 166;
Gay’s description of, ib.

Cavalini Pietro, works attributed to, 203

Cavendish, William, Earl of Devonshire, 90

Cecil, Robert, Earl of Salisbury, 89, 153

Cecil Street, its residents, 88

Celeste, Madam, 184

Centlivre, Mrs., 230;
her hatred to the Jacobites, 231;
Pope’s dislike to, ib.;
Leigh Hunt’s treatment of, 232

Ceracchi, Giuseppe, 66

Chambers, Sir William, 65

Chapone, Mrs. Hester, 428

Charing, village of, 201;
population under Edward I., ib.;
the Falconry or Mews at, 218

Charing Cross, tradition concerning, 201;
Peele’s lines on, 202;
tradition of Queen Eleanor connected with, ib.;
erection and demolition of, 204;
a Royalist ballad on, ib.;
executions at, 205;
introduction of Punch into England at, 208;
Titus Oates, in the pillory at, ib.;
the royal statue at, 209;
Waller’s lines on the statue, 210;
Andrew Marvell’s lines on the Cross, 211;
loss of parts of, 212;
a tradition concerning, ib.;
the pedestal of, ib.;
a rogue exposed in the pillory at, ib.;
punishment of Japhet Crook at, 213;
old prints of, 215;
poetical eulogiums of, ib.;
coffee-houses in the neighbourhood of, 226;
Locket’s ordinary at, 227;
Milton’s lodging at, 232;
other memoranda, 248;
a strange scene at, ib.;
a remark of Dr. Johnson’s on, 234;
site of the post office at, ib.;
ancient hospital at, 235;
former improvements at, ib.;
the “Swan,” and verses by Johnson, 236

Charing Cross Hospital, 233

Charles I., letter written by, 58;
his statue at Charing Cross, 209;
strange story regarding the statue of, 212

Charles II., his progress through London, his coronation, 22;
the two courts in the reign of, 61

Chatterton, 80;
story concerning, 197

Chaucer, his marriage, 108;
favours obtained, 109;
royal post held by, 218

Chesterfield, Earl of, 187

Child’s Bank, 6

Christian Knowledge, Society for Promoting, 414, 464
[Pg 469]
Chunee, the elephant, 95, 419

Cibber, Colley, 312;
characters originated by, 316;
his success as actor and manager, ib.

Cibber, Theophilus, his fate, 317;
his wife, ib.

Clare House Court, 298

Clare Market, 339;
Orator Henley’s appearances in, ib.;
artists’ club at the Bull’s Head in, 346;
Mrs. Bracegirdle’s visits to, 347

Clarges, John, farrier, 93, 301

Clarke, William, proprietor of Exeter Change, 177

Clement’s Inn, 156;
a tradition concerning, ib.;
the hall of, 157;
the New Court and Independent Meeting-house in, 159

Clement’s, St., Church, improvements round, 152;
general dislike to, ib.;
a ferment in the parish of, 153;
distinguished men baptized and buried in, ib.;
adornments of, 155;
Dr. Johnson’s attendance in, ib.

Clement’s, St., Well, 156;
Cleopatra’s Needle, 145

Clifton, bridge over the Avon at, 451

Clifton’s Eating-house, 149

Clinch, Tom, the highwayman, 373

Clive, Kitty, 315

Coaches and coach-stands, 166, 167

Coal Hole, the, 85

Cobb, the upholsterer, anecdote of, 258

Cock and Pye Fields, 356

Cock Lane ghost, the, 196;
the contriver of, 214

Cockpit, or Phoenix Theatre, its site, 304;
Puritan violence against, ib.;
its reopening at the Restoration, 305

Coffee, 36

Coffee-houses, 36;
mentioned by Steele in the Tatler, ib.

Coleridge, S. T., 170

Commons, House of, 101

Congreve, William, 53;
Pope’s declaration regarding, 51;
the successful career of, ib.;
Voltaire’s visit to, ib.;
Curll’s life of, 52

Congreve, Sir William, 88

Conway, Lord, memoranda of, 270

Cooke, George Frederick, 321

Cooke, T. P., 174

Cottenham, Lord, 395

Coutts’s Bank, the strong room of, 86, 87;
the first deposit in, 87;
story of one of the clerks of, ib.;
the site of, and additions to, ib.

Coutts, Thomas, his origin, and marriage, 86;
anecdote of, 448

Covent Garden, 93

Covent Garden Theatre and Sheridan, 328

Coventry, Secretary, 245

Cowley, enmity of the Royalists to, 115;
occasion of “The Complaint” by, ib.;
beautiful lines by, 116;
his death at Chertsey, ib.

Cox, Bessy, 282

Craig’s Court, Charing Cross, 227

Craven, Lord, his life, etc., 294;
miniature Heidelberg erected by, ib.;
his services to the Queen of Bohemia, 295;
patronage of literature, ib.;
employment in King William’s reign, 296;
Miss Benger’s estimate of, ib.;
Quixotic character of, 460

Craven Buildings, fresco portrait at, 297

Craven House, 292, 459

Craven Street, residents of, 139;
diplomatic consultation in, ib.;
epigrams by James Smith and Sir George Rose on it, ib.

“Cries of London,” the, 167

Crockford, his shop in the Strand, 148;
his club, ib.

Cromwell, Oliver, residences of, 226, 279

Crook, Japhet, his punishment, 213;
lines by Pope on, 214

Crouch, Mrs., the singer, 333

Crowle, bon mot on Judge Page by, 217

Crown and Anchor, the, 152, 153;
the great room of, 444

Cumberland, George, Earl of, 120

Cuper’s Gardens, 43

Curl, Edmund, 212

Curtis, Mrs., visits Mrs. Siddons, 91


Davenant, Lady, 404

Davenant, the actor, 429

Davies, Moll, 430

Dawson, Jemmy, 15

Denham, Sir John, works written by, 393;
a drunken frolic of, 452

Denzil Street, 460

Deptford, and Peter the Great in, 45

Design, the School of, 446

De Sully, Duc, 41

Devereux Court, 36;
duel in, ib.;
death of Marchmont Needham in, 37;
relic of Pope at Tom’s Coffee-house, ib.

Devereux, Robert, Earl of Essex, 28;
Spenser’s relation to, ib.;
his house near the Temple, 29;
his plot against Elizabeth, ib.;
his running a-muck in the City, and flight to Essex Gardens, 30;
his capture and death 31;
his mother and sister, 32;
his crimes, 34

Devonshire Club, 148

Dibdin, Charles, his entertainments, 34

Dickens, Charles, 170;
on Seven Dials and Monmouth Street, 385;

Digby, Sir Kenelm, 241;
Ben Jonson’s lines on, ib.

Dilke, Sir C. Wentworth, 170

Disraeli, B., 400

Dobson, Vandyke’s protégé, 200

Dodd, the actor, 328

Doggett, the actor, 310

Donne, Dr., the tomb of his wife, 154;
[Pg 470]his want of self-respect, 289;
strange circumstance recorded, 290;
vision seen by, ib.;
conceits of, 291;
his picture in his shroud, 292;
a divine and a poet, 390

Dowton, the actor, 323

Doyley, 168

Drinking-fountains, the first, 445

Drummond’s Bank, 227, 457

Drury family, 288

Drury House, secret meetings there arranged by Essex, 29;
outbreak decided on at, 288;
site of, 237

Drury Lane, origin of its name, 288;
residents in, 297 et seq.;
a strange scene in, 298;
a duel in, ib.;
pictures of, 299;
the poor poet’s home in, ib.;
its bad repute during the Regency, 460

Drury Lane Theatre, 305;
Pepys’s visits to, 306;
scuffle in the king’s presence in, ib.;
distinguished actresses of, 309 et seq.;
plays produced at, ib.;
Garrick’s first appearance at, 313;
Dr. Johnson’s address on its re-opening, 322;
a riot in 1740 in, 324;
Charles Lamb’s description of, 324, 325;
the rebuilding of, 329;
competitive poems for the opening of, 330;
Byron’s opening address at, ib.;
statue over its entrance, ib.;
pecuniary statements relating to, ib.;
revival of its fortunes by Edmund Kean, 331;
Grimaldi at, 334;
various actors of, ib.;
pictures of royalty at, 338;
recent productions at, ib.

Drury, Sir Robert, 288

Dryden, his lines on the death of Buckingham, 132;
his squabbles with Jacob Tonson, 54;
attack on, 280;
established jokes against, ib.;
Mulgrave’s lines on, 281;
Otway’s defence of, ib.

Dudley, Sir Robert, 369

Dudley, Duchess of, 369

Duke Street, 135

Duke’s Theatre, 429

Durham House, residents of, 92;
sufferings of the Princess Elizabeth in, ib.;
its last occupants, ib.;
banquets given by Henry VII. at, ib.;
mint established at, 95;
Lady Jane Grey’s marriage in, ib.;
the scene of an old legend, 96;
Raleigh in his turret study at, ib.;
purchased by the brothers Adam, ib.

Durham Street, 91

Dyot Street, 462


Eccentrics, club of, 259

Edward III., 110;
his conduct on the death of John of Gaunt, 114

Edward VI. at Temple Bar, 21

Egerton, Lord Chancellor, 391

Eleanor Cross, model of, 138

Eleanor, Queen, crosses in memory of, 138, 202;
tombs of, 203;
the preservation of her body, 204

Elizabeth, Queen, procession on the anniversary of her accession, 9;
adornment of her statue at Temple Bar, 10;
her reception at Temple Bar, 21;
the plot of Essex against, 29;
her relations with Admiral Seymour, 39;
story of the Essex ring, 40;
her favour for Raleigh, 92

Ellesmere. See Egerton

Elliston, Robert William, 326;
stories told of, 327

Epigram, an, a legacy gained by, 139

Erskine, Lord, 424

Essex House, 29;
occupants of, 31;
the Parliamentary general a resident in, 33

Essex, Robert, Earl of, Ben Jonson’s masque on his marriage, 33;
divorce of his countess, and her marriage with Robert Carr, ib.;
general for the Parliament, ib.;
attempts to seize his papers, 34

Essex Street, Strand, 25;
residents in, 34;
Johnson’s club at the Essex Head, 35;
Unitarian chapel in, 443;
memoranda of, ib.

Estcourt, 452;
Steele’s compliments to, 180

Etherage, Sir George, 301;
play by, 431

Etty, residence of, 136

Evans’s Hotel, Covent Garden, 460

Evelyn, John, 134

“Examiner,” the, 123

Exchange, the New, 93;
a tragedy in, ib.;
legends about, ib.;
the White Widow, 94;
the walks of, ib.;
a frequenter of, ib.;
its destruction, 95

Exeter Change, 175;
exhibitions in, ib.;
last tenants of, 176

Exeter Hall, 178

Exeter House, 179

Exeter Place, 261

Exeter Street, 178


Faithorne, William, 148

Fanshawe, Lady, 423

Fanshawe, Sir Richard, 421

Farren, Miss, the actress, 318

Farren, the actor, 335

Faucit, Helen (Mrs. T. Martin), 337

“Field” newspaper, 168

Finch, Lord Chancellor, 265

Finett, Sir John, 240

Fletcher, his execution, 14

Folkes, Martin, 272

Folly, the, 82

Foote, the actor, 315

Fordyce, George, 34

Fortescue, Judge, 394

Fortescue, Pope’s lawyer, 37

Fountain Club, the, 84

Fountain Court Tavern, 84;
the Coal Hole in, 85

Fountain, the, King Street, 381

Franklin, Benjamin, 139;
his landlady and the charitable nun, 275;
[Pg 471]extravagance of his fellow-pressmen, 276;
his visit as ambassador of Massachusetts, 277

Freemasons’ Hall, the, 274

Friend, Sir John, 13

Fuseli, 76;
his residence, 259


Gaiety Theatre, 452

Gardelle, the artist and murderer, 251

Garrick, David, 96, 99;
Johnson’s esteem for, ib.;
his “Chinese Festival,” 185, 186;
anecdote of, 273;
Zoffany’s portrait of, 304;
his career, 313;
his first appearance at Drury Lane, ib.;
his varied talent, 314;
appears on the stage with Quin, ib.;
his death, 315

Gatti’s café, 189

George, Madame St., 59

Geological Society, the, 69

George III., his patronage of art, 73;
his coolness, 338

George IV., Chantrey’s statue of, 226

Gerbier, Sir Balthasar, 72

Gibbons, Grinling, 139

Gibbons’s Tennis Court, 429

Gibbs, the architect, 162

Giles, St., tradition of, 353;
a scurvy worshipper of, 463

Giles’s, St., ancient toll in, 350;
hospital for lepers in, 350;
death of Sir John Oldcastle in, 351;
the gallows in, 352;
site of the hospital, 353;
the manor of, 352-3;
gradual growth of, 355, 356;
its progress after the Great Fire, 356;
settlement of foreigners in, 357;
its increase in Queen Anne’s reign, ib.;
resort of Irish to, ib.;
entries in the parish records of, ib.;
increase of French refugees in, 357;
relief to well-known mendicants in, 359;
the plague in, 360;
the plague-cart of, ib.;
rates levied in consequence of the plague, 361;
hospital church of, 363;
Dr. Mainwaring rector of, ib.;
new church of, 364;
Dr. Heywood, the rector of, ib.;
celebration of the Restoration in, 365;
church extension in, ib.;
a sexton’s bargain with the rector of, 367;
the Resurrection Gate in the churchyard of, ib.;
churchyard of, 367, 368;
new burial-ground of, 368;
celebrated persons buried in the churchyard of, 369, 370;
the oldest monument in the burial-ground of, 370;
persons relieved in, 371;
erection of the new almshouses and school for, ib.;
Hogarth’s studies and scenes in, 372;
Nollekens Smith’s description of, ib.;
the whipping-stone of, ib.;
the Pound in, 373;
the inns of, 374;
resort of Irish beggars to, 376, 377;
the cellars of, 378;
lodgings in, ib.;
beggars, conjurors, and pickpockets of, 379;
the mendicants of, 381;
low Irish in, 385, 386;
persons connected with several streets in, 463;
the author’s visit with a missionary to houses in, 463

Giles’s, St., Hospital, criminals at its gate, on their way to Tyburn, 373

Giraud, his quarrel, 93;
execution, ib.

Globe Theatre, 165

Glover, Mrs., as an actress, 336

Godfrey, Sir E., murder of, 61;
residence of, 142

Godwin, William, 444

Golden Cross, the, 232

Goldsmith, Oliver, a quotation of Dr. Johnson’s cleverly capped by, 18;
lines on Caleb Whitefoord by, 141;
his friends, 197;
an earl’s patronage of, 198;
anecdote of, ib.;
his visit to Northumberland House, ib.

Gondomar, Spanish ambassador, 298

Goodman, and the Drury Lane Company, 308

Gordon, Lord George, 278

Gorges, Sir Ferdinand, 30

Graham, Dr., a London Cagliostro, his rooms and their chief priestess, 102;
his “celestial bed” and “elixir of life,” 103

Grange Inn, 440

Gravelot, the drawing-master, 250

Gray’s Inn, Bacon’s chambers in, 130

Grecian, the, Addison’s description of, 36;
a quarrel at, ib.;
meetings of savans at, 37;
the privy-council held at, ib.

Greenhill, John, 271

Green Ribbon Club, the, 8

Gresham College, 68

Grimaldi at Drury Lane, 334

Gwynn, Nell, her last resting-place, 244;
the birthplace, life, and character of, 301;
a descendant of, 302;
Pepys’s allusion in his “Diary” to, ib.;
her death, ib.;
a memorandum of Evelyn’s regarding, ib.;
Pepys’s estimate of the other actresses associated with, 307;
her last original part, 308


Hackman, the Rev. Mr., the murderer of Miss Ray, 160;
his execution, ib.

Haines, Joe, a clever actor, 308

Hale, Sir Matthew, an eminent student of Lincoln’s Inn, 390

Hare, the murderer, the lamentable condition of, 461

Harley, John Pritt, actor, 336

Harrison, General, the Anabaptist, the brave end of, 205

Haverhill, William de, Henry III.’s treasurer, his mansion and the various uses to which it was put, 388

Haycock’s Ordinary, 443

Haydon, anecdote of, 1;
another, of his early life in London, 77

Hayman, Frank, a St. Martin’s Lane worthy, amusing anecdotes of, 255

Haymarket Theatre, the, Fielding’s “Tom Thumb” brought out at, 438
[Pg 472]
Hazlitt, William, his criticism of the elder Mathews, 182

Heber, Bishop, 397

Helmet Court, memoranda of, 447

Hemings’ Row, St. Martin’s Lane, origin of its name, 458

Henderson, the actor, 319

Henley, Orator, sketch of his life, 339;
his defence of action in a preacher, ib.;
his correspondence with William Whiston, 340;
the shameless advertisements issued by, 340, 341;
lines by Pope in the “Dunciad” on, 342;
his controversy with Pope, ib.;
a contemporary description of, ib.;
his plans for raising money, 343;
a joke on Archbishop Herring by, ib.;
his appearance before the privy-council, ib.;
Hogarth’s two caricatures of, 344;
beginning of one of his sermons, 345;
overawed by two Oxonians, 346

Henrietta Maria, queen of Charles I., the insolent conduct of her French household, and the king’s difficulty in getting rid of them, 58;
her last masques at Somerset House, 59

Henry VII., hospital founded on the site of the Savoy by, 114

Herbert, Lord, of Cherbury, a Quixotic quarrel of, 194;
commencement of his work, “De Veritate,” 265;
a remarkable vision which is said to have appeared to, ib.;
reflections on passing the residence of, 266

Herring, Archbishop, Swift’s opposition to, 344

Hewson, the supposed original Strap of “Roderick Random,” 136

Heywood, Dr., rector of St. Giles’s, Puritan petition against, 365

Hill, Captain, a well-known profligate bully, his drunken jealousy of Mountfort the actor, 49;
his attempt to carry off Mrs. Bracegirdle, 50;
cowardly murder of Mountfort, by, 51

Hill, Mr. Thomas, the supposed prototype of Paul Pry, 103

Hilliard, Nicholas, Queen Elizabeth’s miniature-painter, 244

“Histriomastix,” the, Prynne’s punishment for a scurrilous note in, 59

Hodges, Dr., his account of the commencement and progress of the plague, 262

Hogarth, 72;
his picture of “Noon,” 372

Hog Lane, St. Giles’s (now Crown Street), 371

Holborn, gradual extension and first pavement of, 355;
allusions to a doleful procession up the Heavy Hill of, 374

Hollar, the German engraver, description of a scarce view of Somerset House by, 63;
the residence of, 157

Holmes, Copper, a well-known character on the river, 247

Holy Land, the, a part of St. Giles’s, 386

Hone, Nathaniel, 258

Hood, Thomas, his “Bridge of Sighs,” 450

Hook, Theodore, 102

Howard, Lady Margaret, Sir John Suckling’s fantastic simile in lines on her feet, 195

Howard, Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, discovery of the cipher used by—his treason and death, 27

Howard, Thomas, Earl of Arundel, an amateur of art, Clarendon’s description of, 42;
Vansomer’s portrait of, ib.;
his devotion in the pursuit of objects of art, 43;
disposal of his statues, marbles, and library, ib.;
remarks made by him in a dispute with Charles I., ib.

Howard, Philip, Earl of Arundel, a letter to, 27;
memorial in the Tower of, ib.

Hudson, the portrait-painter, 272

Hungerford, Lord Walter, first Speaker of the House of Commons, 137

Hungerford, Sir Edward, founder of Hungerford Market, 137

Hungerford Market, the site of, 137;
the origin and object of, 138;
vicissitudes of, ib.;
an unlucky speculation at, ib.

Hungerford Suspension Bridge, 138;
the purchase of, 451;
the new railway bridge in place of, 138;
the railway station at, ib.

Hunter, Dr. William, O’Keefe’s description of him lecturing on anatomy, 78

Hunter, Dr. John, particulars of his professional life, 420, 421

Hunt, Leigh, the imprisonment of, 123;
his critical remarks on the elder Mathews, 182


“Illustrated London News,” the proprietor and staff of, 55

Ingram, Mr. Herbert, proprietor of the “Illustrated London News,” career and death of, 55

Ireland, Samuel, father of the celebrated literary impostor, the residence of, 46;
his belief in the genuineness of “Vortigern” as a work of Shakspere’s, 47

Ireland, W. H., the true story of the Shakspere forgery committed by, 46;
effect of the extraordinary praise lavished on, 47;
supporters and opponents of, ib.;
damnation of his play of “Vortigern,” ib.

“Isabella,” Southerne’s tragedy of, effect of Mrs. Siddons’s acting in, 91

Ivy Bridge, narrow passage to the Thames under, and mansion near, 91


Jacobites, the cant words used by, 15

James I., pageants on his passage through the city, 21
[Pg 473]
James Street, Adelphi, No. 2, the residence of Mr. Thomas Hill, the Hull of “Gilbert Gurney,” 103

Jansen, an architect, works by, 191

Jekyll, Sir Joseph, his obnoxious bill, and the fury of the mob against, 410;
his bon-mot on Lord Kenyon’s spits, 423

Jennings, Frances. See Widow, the White

Jerdan, William, 83

John, King of France, his entrance as a captive into London, 112;
his honourable return to England after having been liberated on parole, ib.;
his death at the Savoy, ib.

John of Padua, Henry VIII.’s architect, 57

John, Saint, the foundation of the hospital of, 114;
abuses of, transference of its funds, etc., 115;
Dr. John Killigrew appointed master of, ib.;
Strype’s description of the old hall of, 117

John Street, Adelphi, 99

Johnson, Dr., his conversation with Goldsmith on Westminster Abbey, 17;
club formed at the Essex Head by—its principal members, 35;
his high estimation for Garrick, 97;
Garrick’s remark on the philosopher’s friendship for Beauclerk, 98;
his three reasons for the black skin of the negro race, 149;
an Irishman’s opinion of, ib.;
his pleasant evenings at the Mitre with an old college friend, 150;
Boswell’s account of his solemn devotion during divine service, 155;
extract from a letter written to Mrs. Thrale by, 156;
his first residence in London, 178;
an eccentric habit of, 187;
beginning of his address for the re-opening of Drury Lane Theatre, 322

Johnstone, Irish, 335

Jones, Colonel, his execution, 205

Jones, Inigo, his plan for laying out Lincoln’s Inn Fields, 402

Jones, the actor, 323

Jonson, Ben, dialogues, speeches, and masques by, 22, 33;
his residence when a child, 142;
a story of, 251;
early life of, 399;
tradition of, ib.;
his exploit in Flanders, ib.

Jordan, Mrs., 326


Kauffman, Angelica, 76

Kean, Charles, 338

Kean, Mrs. Charles (Miss Ellen Tree), 338

Kean, Edmund, habits of, 85;
his early success in London, 88;
his origin, early life, and first triumphs in London, 331;
Hazlitt’s remarks on, 332

Keeley, Robert, the actor, 337

Keelings the, 405

Kelly, Michael, 334

Kelly, Miss, actress, 336;
attacks on, ib.

Kemble, Charles, 321

Kemble, John, 320;
generous act of the Duke of Northumberland to, ib.;
Leigh Hunt’s picture of, ib.

Kenilworth, Lord of, 28

Kennington Common, execution of Jacobites on, 14

Kensington, South, transfer of pictures from the National Gallery to, 224

Kent, the rising under Wat Tyler, 112

Kenyon, Lord, jokes on, 423;
his stinginess and bad Latin, ib.

Killigrew, Dr. Henry, 119

Killigrew, Mrs. Anne, 119

Killigrew, Thomas, 119;
actors in his company, 308

King, Dr., Principal of St. Mary’s Hall, Oxford, 36

King, Dr. William, lines on the Beefsteak Club by, 174

King, the original Sir Peter Teazle, 321

King’s College and its museum, 66, 447;
models and instruments presented by Queen Victoria, ib.

King’s College Hospital, 438

Kirby, Mr., 73, 74

Kit Cat Club, 51;
institution of the, 85;
origin of its name, ib.;
the summer rendezvous of, 86;
Lady Mary Wortley Montague the toast of, ib.

Kneller, Sir Godfrey, 72;
his life and character, 267;
the witty banter of, 268;
his vanity, 269;
how Jacob Tonson got pictures out of, ib.;
his conviction of the legitimacy of the Pretender, ib.

Knight Templars, the, 25

Knollys, Lettice, Countess of Essex, afterwards Lady Leicester, 31

Knowledge, Christian, the Society for Promoting, 461

Königsmark, Count, 193

Kynaston, Sir Francis, 71, 187

Kynaston, the actor, 187, 432


Lacy, a favourite actor, 308

Laguerre, the French painter, 246

Lamb, Charles, tragedy in his family, 285;
his devotion to his sister, 286

Lancaster, the Earl of, 107

Lancaster, John, Duke of, favours Wickliffe, 109;
his peril from the London mob, 110;
his escape, ib.;
amende of the Londoners to, ib.;
his marriage and connections, ib.;
his unpopularity and violence, 119;
clause aimed by Wat Tyler against, 112;
destruction of his London palace, etc., 113;
his death and burial, 114

Lancaster, the Duchy of, 122, 450

Lander, Richard, 120

Langhorne, Dr., 396

Law Courts, new, 147

“Law Times,” Office, 168

Layer, Christopher, 17

Learning, Society for the encouragement of, 49
[Pg 474]
Lee, the poet, his death, 154

Lepers, 354

Lewis, the comedian, 274;
his acting, 323, 324

Lillie, Charles, the perfumer, 84

Limput, Remigius van, 187

Liston, the comedian, 323

Lincoln’s Inn, origin of its name, 387;
the Chancery Lane side of, 388;
the gateway of, ib.;
the chapel, 388, 389;
distinguished students of, 390 et seq.;
persons buried in the chapel, 392 et seq.;
old customs and laws of, 397, 398;
disposal of Hogarth’s picture, “Preaching before Felix,” at, 398;
the new hall, library, and garden of, ib., 464;
Mr. Disraeli’s studies at, 400

Lincoln’s Inn Field, part of Fickett’s field, 401;
King James regulates building in, 401, 402;
Inigo Jones’s plan for laying out and building, 402;
state in the time of Charles I. and Charles II.;
Gay’s sketch of its dangers, 403;
Earl of Rochester’s house in, 404;
execution of plotters against Elizabeth in, ib.;
procession of Thomas Sadler, the thief, through, ib.;
Lord Russell’s death in, 405;
improvements in 1735 in, 410;
Macaulay’s picture of, ib.;
distinguished inhabitants of, 414 et seq.;
Tennyson’s chambers in, 418;
Mr. Povey’s house in, 428

Lindsey, Earl, 416, 417

Lindsey House, 417

Literary Club, Boswell and Johnson at, 17

Literary Fund Society, 427

Literature, Royal Society of, 259

Locket’s Ordinary, 227

London, growth and changes of, 2;
points of departure for tours in, ib.;
start for the author’s tour in, 3;
banks in, 7;
the rebels under Tyler in, 112;
King William at the celebration of the peace of Ryswick in, 23, 24;
a bishop beheaded by the mob of, 26;
cruel treatment of a Spaniard by the mob of, 213;
the street signs of, 237;
foreigners in 1580 in, 356;
a glance at an ancient map of, 356, 357;
Pennant on its churchyards, 367;
crusade against Irish and other vagrants, 377;
royal fears as to its increase, 401;
its history an epitome of that of the world, 441;
its newspapers and periodicals, 454

Long Acre, the plague in, 262;
Oliver Cromwell’s residence in, 279;
Tory tavern Club in, 284

Lord Mayor’s Day, 23

Loutherberg, De, 167

Lowin, John, 154

Lyceum, the, 171;
exhibitions in, ib.;
experiment in, 172;
Mathew’s entertainment in, ib.;
Beefsteak Club meet in, ib.;
Mr. T. P. Cooke’s early triumphs in, 174

Lyndhurst, Lord, 395

Lyons, Emma (afterwards Lady Hamilton), 102

Lyon’s Inn, 165;
sale of its materials, ib.;
murder of Mr. Weare, ib.

Lyttelton, Sir Thomas, 44


M’Ardell, Hogarth’s engraver, 251

Mackintosh, Sir James, 464

Macklin, the actor, 436

Macready, William Charles, 337

Maginn, Dr., ballad by, 232

Malibran, Madame, 334

Manos, Gannee, and other beggars, 382

Mansfield, the Earl of, 394

Mardyn, Mrs., the actress, 335

Marlborough, the Duchess of, Congreve’s legacy to, 52;
her regard for Congreve, 53

Martin’s St., Lane, residents of, 239 et seq.;
Beard, the singer, 249;
Old Slaughter’s Coffee-house, ib.;
houses built by Payne in, 252;
curious staircase in No. 96, 253;
a house favoured by artists in, ib.;
Roubilliac’s first studio in, 257;
old house of the Earls of Salisbury in, 256;
changes in, 261

Martin’s-in-the-Fields, St., 242;
the church of, 244;
the dust enshrined in, ib.;
J. T. Smith’s visit to the vaults of, 246;
the parochial abuses of, ib.;
the old watch and stocks of, 256

Marvell, Andrew, 209;
the grave of, 370

Mary, Queen, 21

Mary, St. Savoy, the Chapel of, the dead interred in, 121;
its destruction by fire, 122;
its restoration, ib.

Mary, St., Roncevalles, the hospital of, 235

Mary-le-Strand, St., 162;
construction of, ib.;
allusions by Pope and Addison to, 163;
tragedy at, ib.;
interior of, ib.

Mathews, his entertainment, 140;
his “Mail-coach Adventures,” 172;
his bargains with Mr. Arnold, 181;
his various entertainments, ib.;
failure of his health, and death, 182;
his first attempts as an actor, 298;
his first appearance in London, 323

Matthews, Bishop of Durham, 98

Mayerne, Sir Theodore, 239;
story of, 240;
his death, 260

Maynard, Mr. Serjeant, 404

Mainwaring, Dr., 363, 364

Maypole in the Strand, the, 160;
its fall and restoration, 161;
removal of, 162

May’s Buildings, 259

Mellon, Miss, the actress, 87;
her first and second marriages, 88;
her first appearance at Drury Lane, 448;
leaves her fortune to Miss Burdett Coutts, ib.

Mendicants’ Convivial Club, 462

Mews, origin of the name, 217;
notes concerning, 218;
old bookshop at the gate of one, 219
[Pg 475]
Michael’s, St., Alley, Cornhill, 36

Milford Lane, 38

Millar, the publisher, 56

Miller, Joe, his burial-place, 348;
his début on the stage, 439;
his last success, ib.;
his haunt, 440

Milton, John, 232

Misaubin, Dr., 253

Mitre, the, 150

Mohun, Lord, 50, 245

Monk, General, his death, 65;
the Restoration effected by, 61;
his vulgar wife, 301;
invited to a conference by the Earl of Northumberland, 200

Monmouth Street, 385;
Mr. Dickens’s description of, ib.;
modern civilisation in, 463

Montague, Lady M. W., 86

Montfort, Simon de, 107

More, Sir Thomas, 164

Morgan, the Welsh buccaneer, 264

Morley’s Hotel, 456

“Morning Chronicle,” 167;
the end of, 168

“Morning Post,” 170

Mortimer, the English Salvator, 46

Moss, the engraver, 63

Mottley, the actor, 439;
origin of his jest book, 440

Mountfort, Mrs., 434

Mountfort, the actor, 50;
his career, 435

Munden, Charles Lamb on, 327

Murphy, Arthur, 394

Murray, Major, 143

Mytens, Daniel, 240


National Gallery, opening of, 219;
the paltry design of, 75;
the first purchase of pictures for, 222;
the gems of, 223, 224;
purchases and donations for, ib.;
Turner’s bequest to, 224;
proposed removal of the pictures from, ib.;
Jacob Bell’s bequest, 225;
enlargement of the, ib.

Needham, Marchmont, 37;
his burial-place, 155

Nelson, Admiral, a tradition of, 71

Nelson Column, the, original estimate for, 220;
bassi relievi on, ib.;
adornment of the pedestal of, 221

Newcastle, the Duke of, his house in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, 410;
his levees, ib.;
the porter’s reply to an intruder on, 411;
impertinence of his cook, 412;
anecdote of, ib.;
Smollett’s and Walpole’s sketches of, 413;
Walpole’s review of his career, ib.;
his reply to Lord Bute, 414

Newgate ballads, 463

New Inn, 164

Newspaper offices, 454

Nisbett, Mrs., 335

Nivernois, the Duc de, 18

Nokes, James, 432

Nollekens, the sculptor, 379

Norfolk Street, 44 et seq.;
Charles Dickens’s sketch of, 445

Northampton, the Earl of, 191

Northampton, Algernon, tenth Earl of, 192, 195

Northumberland, the wizard Earl of, his marriage 192;
treason, etc., ib.

Northumberland, the Duke of, 192

Northumberland House, 191;
the oldest part of, 195;
accident at, ib.;
the letters and date on its façade, 196;
destruction of the Strand front by fire, 197;
Sir John Hawkins’s and Goldsmith’s visit to Mr. Percy at, 198;
Goldsmith’s account of a visit to, 199;
pictures in the gallery of, ib.

Northumberland Street, 142;
demolition of, 200

Nottingham, the Countess of, 39, 40

Noy, Attorney-general, 389


Oates, Titus, 208, 302

O’Keefe, the dramatist, 18, 258

Oldcastle, Sir John, Lord Cobham, 352;
his imprisonment, escape, and death, ib.

Oldfield, Mrs., actress, 186;
her merits as a comedian, 310;
her death, 311

“Old Slaughter’s,” the frequenters of, 249;
Hogarth and Roubilliac at, ib.

Olympic, the, 164;
Mr. Robson’s representations at, 165

Oratory, Henley’s, 339

Oxberry, the actor, 335

Oxburgh, Sir John, 13

Oxford, the Earl of, 137


Page, Judge, 217;
the “Dunciad” on, ib.

Paget, Lord, 26

Paintings, the first exhibition in London of, 75

Palsgrave Head Tavern, 148, 151

Parr, Dr., 47

Parr, Old, 91

Parsons, parish-clerk of St. Sepulchre’s, 214

Partridge, the charlatan cobbler, 90

Pasquin (Williams), Anthony, 142

Patterson, Samuel, bookseller, 34

Payne, Mr. James, collector of MSS., 459

Payne, Roger, bookbinder, 457

Pendrell, Richard, his tomb and epitaph, 368

Penn, the Quaker, 44

Pepys, residence of, 135;
his career, 136;
residence of his father-in-law, 282;
visits Drury Lane Theatre, 302;
Lord Cottenham, a descendant of the author of the “Diary,” 395

Perceval, Spencer, 394

Percy, the Earl Marshal, 109
[Pg 476]
Percy, Elizabeth, her marriages, 192

Perkins, Sir William, 12

Perry, James, 167

Pest-houses, 297

Peter the Great, 45;
his evenings in York Buildings, 136

Peters, Hugh, 207

Petty, William, 42

Philips, Ambrose, 248;
Pope’s lines on, ib.

Physicians, the Royal College of, 225

Pickett, Alderman, 148;
street named after, 147

“Pic-Nic,” the, London newspaper, 139

Pidgeon, Bat, barber, 160

Pierce, Edward, sculptor, 49

Pine, the engraver, 252

“Pine Apple,” the, 178

Plague, the Great, 143;
its origin in London, 262;
its progress, 263

Poitiers, the victory of, 111

Pope, the, 9

Pope, a relic of, 37;
lines on the death of Buckingham by, 132;
insolence of, 248;
reply of Sir Godfrey Kneller to, 268;
his dispute with Orator Henley, 342

Pope, Miss, the actress, 273;
her manner on the stage, 321

Porridge Island, 236

Porter, Mrs., the actress, 43

Portugal Row, 403, 421

Portugal Street, 429 et seq.

Precinct of the Savoy, 122

Precinct Club, the, 169

Prior, his boyhood, 229;
his attachments, 282;
his death, 283

Pritchard, Mrs., actress, 317

Proctor, student of the Royal Academy, 80

Prynne, William, 398

Punch, the puppet-show, 208

“Punch,” the periodical, 303


Quakers, the, 44

“Queen” newspaper, 168

Queen Street, Great, 263;
residents in, 264 et seq.;
residence of Lord Herbert of Cherbury in, 266

Quin, the actor, 187, 271;
appears on the stage with Garrick, 312;
his career as an actor, ib.;
appears at Portugal Street Theatre, 437


Radcliffe, Dr., 347

Radford, Thomas, 93

Railton, designer of the Nelson Memorial, 220

Raimbach, the engraver, 258

Raleigh, Sir Walter, 92;
Durham House unjustly taken from, 96;
costly dress worn by, ib.

Rann, John, “Sixteen-stringed Jack,” 374

Rawlinson, Dr., 16

Ray, Miss, murder of, 160

Rebecca, Biaggio, 76

Reddish, Samuel, the actor, 318

Reeve, John, 184

Rejected Addresses, the, 140

Rennie, John, architect, 124

Reynolds, Sir Joshua, his club in Essex Street, 35;
his adherence to the Spring Garden Society, 73;
his lectures, 83;
lying-in-state of, 79;
residences of, 274

Rhodes, the bookseller and actor, 233, 305

Rice, Mr. (“Jim Crow”), 180

Rich, Penelope, 31

Rich, the actor and manager, 435;
legend regarding, 436;
Garrick’s lines on, 438

Richardson, the humourist, 187

Richmond, the Duke of, his gallery at Whitehall, 72

Rimbault, the clockmaker, 303

Rivet, John, a brazier, 212

Roberts, the solicitor, 143

Robin Hood Debating Society, 443

Robinson, Mrs., 318

Robinson’s Coffee-house, 215

Robson, Mr. Frederick, 165, 236

Roman Bath, in the Strand, 169

Roman Road, ancient, 349

Romilly, Sir Samuel, 400

Rookery, the, 463

Roubilliac, his burial-place, 246;
his studio, 255;
a pupil of, 257

Royal Academy, the, Somerset House, 65;
the germs of, 71;
its service to English art, 75;
its first officers, 74;
catalogue, etc., 75

Royal Academicians, the, 74

Royal Society, the, 68;
its portraits of Newton, and other curiosities, 69

“Rummer,” the, 229;
the scene of Jack Sheppard’s first robbery, 230

Russel, Lord William, 285;
his alleged plot, 405;
his appearance before the Council, 406;
his interview with French agents, ib.;
petition presented for his life, 407;
the last days of, ib.;
his execution, 408

Russel, Lady Rachel, her petition for her husband’s life, 407;
her letter to Dr. Fitzwilliams, 408

Rutland, the Earls of, 91

Ryan, the actor, 272

Rymer, the antiquary, 43, 154


Saa, Don Pantaleon de, his quarrel with Giraud, 93

Sacheverell, Dr., 409

Sadler, Thomas, the thief, 404

St. Leonards, Lord, 396

Sala, G. A., 122

Sale, George, 49

Salisbury, Earls of, old house of the, 256

Salisbury House, Little, 89

Salisbury House, Old, 89

Salisbury Street, 89
[Pg 477]
Sandwich Islands, the king and queen of, 102

Sandwich, Montague, Earl of, 415

Savage, Richard, 216;
his escape from execution, ib.

Savage Club, the, 460

Savoy, Peter, Earl of, 107;
Henry III.’s grant to, ib.;
transfer of his manor to the chapter of Montjoy, 108

Savoy, the, moonlight meetings in, 106;
derivation of the name of, 107;
occupants of the palace of, 108;
Chaucer’s marriage in, ib.;
the vicissitudes of, 109;
attack of the mob of London on, 110;
a residence of John, King of France, 111;
its destruction by Wat Tyler, 112;
erection of an hospital on its site, 114;
its suppression and removal, 115;
Conference of the Savoy, 116;
a French church in, 117;
a sanctuary for debtors, ib.;
Strype’s description of it, ib.;
clandestine marriages in, 118;
its state in the reign of George II., ib.;
portions of it remaining in 1816, ib.;
the destruction of, 119;
Mr. G. A. Sala’s description of the Precinct of, 122;
traditions still lingering in, 123

Savoy Street, 116

Scheemakers, 333

School of Design, 446

Serle Street, origin of its name, 464

Serle’s coffee-house, Addison’s visit to, 464;
a curious letter extant at, ib.

Seven Dials, the, Mr. Dickens’s description of, 385;
Gay’s description of, 461;
the degraded state of, 462

Seymour, Lord Thomas, 39;
the mint established in aid of his designs, 95

Seymour, Sir Edward, anecdote of, 234

Seymour Place. See Arundel House

Shadwell, son of the poet, 135

Shaftesbury, Earl of, 179

Shallow, the revelry of, 158

Sheppard, Jack, the burial-place of, 246

Sheridan, Thomas, 187

Sheridan, Richard Brinsley, produces the “School for Scandal,” 322;
his extravagance, 328;
sang froid exhibited in the House of Commons by, ib.;
his death, 329

Shipley, Mr., founder of the Society of Arts, 100;
his pupils, ib.

Shippen, “Honest,” 45

Shipyard, the, gable-ended house in, 148

Shorter, Sir John, 22

Siddons, Mrs., 91, 319;
the homage of distinguished men to, 320

Signs, the suppression of, 237;
adornment of old London by, 238

Simon, Old, 379-80;
portraits of, 380;
anecdotes of his dog “Rover,” ib.

Singers, theatrical, 333 et seq.

Slaughter’s, Old, 249;
Hogarth and Roubilliac at, ib.

Slaughter’s, New, 253

Sloane, Sir Hans, 284

Smith, the brothers, 330

Smith, James, 139;
epigram by, 140

Snow, the goldsmith, 151, 443

Soane, Sir John, 427

Soane Museum, the, curiosities in, 424;
impediments thrown in the way of visitors to, ib.;
its treasures, 425 et seq.;
its pictures and engravings, 426;
a satire on, 465

Sœur, Le, French sculptor, 209

Somerset, the Protector, 57

Somerset House, 56;
Elizabeth’s visits to Lord Hunsdon in, 58;
Anne of Denmark’s masquerades in, ib.;
pranks of Henrietta Maria’s French household in, ib.;
Puritans offended by Henrietta Maria’s Roman Catholic chapel in, 59;
tombs under the great square of, ib.;
death of Inigo Jones in, ib.;
the celebration of Protestant service in, ib.;
the lying-in-state of Cromwell in, 60;
Pepys’s description of a strange scene in the presence-chamber of, 61;
lying-in-state of Monk, Duke of Albemarle, in, ib.;
the murder of Sir Edmondbury Godfrey, ib.;
Waller made drunk at, 62;
apartments for poor noblemen, ib.;
erection of new Government offices on the site of the old palace of, ib.;
scene witnessed by Pepys at, 63;
old prints of, ib.;
the architect of the modern buildings of, 64;
demolition of the old palace of, ib.;
Edward VI.’s furniture, and Catherine of Braganza’s breakfast room in, ib.;
dimensions of the building completed by Sir William Chambers, 65;
retirement of the Royal Academy to, ib.;
figures on the Strand front of, ib.;
Government clerks and public offices in, 66;
statue and figure in the east wing of, ib.;
office for auditing public accounts in, ib.;
learned societies sheltered in, 67;
distinguished men who must have frequented the halls of, ib.;
a legend of, 71;
a tradition of Nelson at, ib.;
accident during Reynolds’s lecture at, 78;
day-dreams in the great quadrangle of, 81

Somerset Coffee-house, 446

Somerset House Stairs, 63

Southampton Street, 185;
Garrick’s house in, ib.

Sparkes, Isaac, Irish comedian, 274

“Spectator,” office of the, 124

Spelman, Lady, 40

Spelman, Sir Henry, 391

Spenser, his death and burial, 28

Spiller, James, comedian, 154;
his death, 438

Spring Gardens Academy of Art, the, 72;
dissimulation of the king in relation to, 73;
intrigues against, ib.

[Pg 478]Stage, the, reform of declamation and costume on, 325;
first appearance of actresses, in London, on, 429

Stapleton, Walter, his death, 26

Steele, Sir Richard, his coffee-houses, 36;
his residence, 135;
his allusions to Lincoln’s Inn, 398

Stone, Nicholas, sculptor, 278

Storace, operas written by, 334

Stothard, the artist, sketch of his career, 283

Strahan and Co., bankers, 151, 451 (note)

Strand, the:—
Essex Street, 25;
Exeter House, 26;
Exeter Place, ib.;
Essex House 29;
Milford Lane, 38;
Devereux Court, ib.;
Arundel House, 39;
Arundel Street, 43;
Norfolk Street, 44;
Surrey Street, 48;
Howard Street, 49;
Strand Lane, 53;
Anderson’s pills in, ib.;
Turk’s Head Coffee-house, ib.;
residence of Jacob Tonson in, 54;
occupants of No. 141, ib.;
office of the “Illustrated London News” in, 55;
Somerset House, 56;
Haydon’s first London lodgings in, 77;
Beaufort House, 83;
the residence of Blake, in, ib.;
office of the “Sun” newspaper, 83;
Coutts’s Bank, 86;
Cecil Street, 88;
Salisbury Street and House, 89;
Mrs. Siddons’s residence in, 91;
Durham Street and House, ib.;
Buckingham Street, 135;
Villiers Street, ib.;
Duke Street, ib.;
York Buildings, ib.;
Hungerford Bridge and Market, 136;
Craven Street, 139;
Northumberland Street, 143;
the strata of, 146;
the footway in Edward II.’s time, 147;
discovery of a small bridge in, ib.;
houses on the north side of, ib. et seq.;
Butcher Row, 148;
Palsgrave Place, 151;
the Maypole in, 160;
St. Clement’s Danes, 152;
a scene of Elizabeth’s time in, 161;
St. Mary’s-le-Strand, 162;
New Inn, 164;
Wych Street, ib.;
Lyon’s Inn, 165;
Catherine Street, 166;
Doyley’s warehouse in, 168;
Wellington Street, ib.;
Lyceum Theatre, 171;
Exeter Change, 175;
familiar sounds to the old residents in, 177;
Exeter Street, 178;
Exeter Hall, ib.;
a resident in, ib.;
Exeter House, 179;
Burleigh Street, ib.;
Adelphi Theatre, 180;
Southampton Street, 185;
Bedford Street, 186;
Gaiety Theatre, 452;
memoranda relating to the south side of, 443;
do. relating to the north side of, 452

Strand, Bridge, the, 169

Strand Lane, 53;
mentioned by Addison, 169

Strand Theatre, 444, 446

Streets, the nomenclature of, 103

Strype, the antiquary, 117

Suckling, Sir John, 195;
his death, 241

Suett, the actor, 321

Suffolk House, 194

Sullivan, Luke, engraver, 251

“Sun,” office of the, 83

Surrey Street, 48

Surgeons, College of, 419

Swan, the, Charing Cross, 236


Tart-Hall, 43

Taylor, the water-poet, 279;
his complaint regarding carriages and tobacco, ib.;
epitaph on, 280

Tempest, Peter Molyn, engraver, 167

Temple Bar, its erection, 4;
description of, 5;
threatened destruction of, 6;
fixing the heads of traitors on, 11;
curious print of, 13;
heads of Fletcher, Townley, and Oxburgh, exposed on, ib.;
apprehension of a man for firing bullets at the two last heads exhibited on, 16;
Counsellor Layer’s head blown by a terrible wind from, ib.;
removal of the last iron spike from, 17;
a quotation of Dr. Johnson’s at, ib.;
proclamation of peace at, 18;
its adornment on public occasions, 19;
opening its gates to the sovereign, 20;
reception of Queen Elizabeth at, ib.;
reception of royal persons at, 21;
pageants on the passage of King James, ib.;
the mournful celebrity of, 22

Temple Club, 453

Tenison, Dr. Thomas, 247

Tennyson, Alfred, 418

Terry, an actor, 183

Thames, the, scenery on its banks, 136;
embankment of, 190;
old watermen on, 247;
Copper Holme’s ark on, ib.

Theatres, an old custom at, 172;
a riot in one, 186

Theatre, the Duke’s, 429;
a sword-fight between two factions in, 430;
the principal ladies of, ib.;
Pepys’s visits to, 431;
the principal performers at, 432 et seq.;
plays of Congreve produced at, 434;
Steele’s account of an audience in, 435;
the last proprietor of, ib.;
riot at, 436;
Macklin’s performance at, 437;
Quin’s appearance at, ib.

Thomson, the music-seller, 177

Thornbury, the Rev. Nathaniel, 47

Thornhill, Sir James, 72

Thurloe, Secretary, 392-393

Thurtell, the murderer of Weare, 165

Thynne, Tom, 193

Tillotson, Dr., 390

Tobacco, introduction of, 96

Tom’s Coffee-house, 37

Tonson, Jacob, 54

Tories, they establish tavern-clubs, 284

Townley, execution of, 14

Trafalgar Square, 220;
statues and fountains in, 221, 456

Trojan Horse, Bushnell’s, 7

Tunstall, Bishop, 92

Turk’s Head Coffee-house, 53

Turk’s Head, Gerrard Street, 72

Turner, J. W. M., anecdote of, 78;
[Pg 479]his opinion of the Thames scenery, 136;
characteristics of his works, 224;
his bequests to the nation, ib.

Tyburn, criminals on their way to, 373

Tyler Wat, 112;
a mistake of Shakspere regarding, 114 (note)

Tyrconnel, the Duchess of. See Widow, the White

Twinings, the Messrs., 35, 152


Ussher, Archbishop, 396

Union Club, the, 457


Vanderbank starts an academy of art, 72

Vane, Sir Harry, 200

Vere Street, Clare Market, 345

Vernon, Robert, 224

Vertue, 8

Vestris, Madame, 175

Via Trinovantica, 349

Victoria embankment, 191

“Ville de Paris,” the Olympic Theatre partially built of its timbers, 164

Villiers Street, 135

“Vine,” the, in St. Giles’s, 375

Vine Street, origin of the name, 300

Vinegar Yard, Drury Lane, 300

Voltaire rebukes Congreve’s vanity, 52

“Vortigern,” by W. H. Ireland, 46


Waagen, Dr., 199

Waldo, Sir Timothy, 412

Wallack, the actor, 334

Waller, the poet, Saville’s saying of, 62;
lines by, 210

Wallis, Albany, residence of, 46

Walpole, a circumstance to surprise, 78;
visits the Cock Lane ghost, 196

Warburton, Bishop, 397

Ward, Dr., inventor of “Friar’s Balsam,” disposal of his statue by Carlini, 100;
attends on George II., ib.

Ward, Edward, 281

Waterloo Bridge, Dupin and Canova’s declaration respecting, 124;
chief features of, ib.;
anecdote of Old Jack, a horse employed to drag the stone to, ib.;
the dark arch of, 451

Watling Street, 349

Weare, Mr. William, 165

Webster, Benjamin, as an actor, 184

Wedderburn, his insincerity, 415;
Lord Clive’s reward to, ib.

Welch, Judge, apprehends a highwayman, 378

Wellington Street, newspapers and periodicals in, 167, 168, 454

West, anecdote of, 73;
his patronage of Proctor, 80

Westminster Fire Office, 257

Whetstone Park, 400

Whitefoord, Caleb, 141;
Adam’s room in the house of, 142;
Goldsmith’s lines on, ib.

White Horse livery stables, 257

Whitelock, Bulstrode, 234

Whittington Club, the, 152

Wickliffe, John, refuses tribute to the Pope, 109;
appears before the Bishop of London, ib.

Widow, the White, the story of, 94

Wild House, 277, 459

Wilkes, Robert, actor, 311

Wilkinson, Tate, 123

Willis, Dr. Thomas, 241

Wilson, the painter, 189, 283

Wimbledon House, Strand, and Doyley’s warehouse erected on the site of, 168

Winchester House, 271

Wither, George, 120, 121

Woffington, Peg, president of the Beefsteak Club, 173;
her career, 316

Wolcot, Dr. (Peter Pinder), 84

Wollaston, Dr., discoveries of, 88;
anecdote of, 85

Woodward, the actor, 315

Wych Street, 164, 454

Wynford, Lord, epigram on, 415


Yates, Mr., the actor, 183

Yates, Mrs., actress, 317

York House, old, 126;
river view of, 127;
celebrated men connected with, ib.;
Lord Bacon’s life here, ib.;
pictures, busts, and statues at, 131;
paintings placed in it by the Duke of Buckingham, ib.;
Pepys’s visit to, 132;
streets built on its site, 135

York Stairs, description of, 134

York Buildings, waterworks, 135, 445

York Buildings, Water Company, 445

Young, Charles, the actor, 323, 335


Zoffany, the artist, 303;
Garrick’s patronage of, 304

 

THE END.

 

 


Footnotes:

[1] Tom Taylor’s Life of Haydon, vol. i. p. 49.

[2] Strype, B. iii. p. 278.

[3] It was pulled down in January 1878.

[4] The steepness of Holborn Hill was abolished by the new viaduct in 1869.

[5] Cunningham’s London, vol. i. p. 260.

[6] Archenholz, p. 227.

[7] Beautifully reprinted in 1863 by Mr. J. C. Hotten.

[8] Walpole’s Anecdotes of Painting, vol. iii. p. 274.

[9] Pamphlet “The Burning of the Pope,” quoted in Brayley’s Londiniana, vol. iv. p. 74.

[10] Roger North’s Examen, p. 574.

[11] Ibid. p. 574.

[12] For a further account of these Anti-Papal proceedings the reader may refer to Sir Roger de Coverly, with notes by W. H. Wills.

[13] State Trials, x. pp. 105-124; Burnet, ii. p. 407.

[14] Hume, vol. vii. p. 220.

[15] Evelyn, vol. ii. p. 341.

[16] Temple Bar, the City Golgotha (1853), p. 33.

[17] Cobbett’s State Trials, vol. xviii.

[18] State Trials, vol. xviii. p. 375.

[19] Annual Register (1766), p. 52.

[20] Nichol’s Literary Anecdotes.

[21] Brayley.

[22] Boswell, p. 258.

[23] Ovid, de Art. Amand., B. v. 339.

[24] Recollections of the Life of John O’Keefe, vol. i. p. 81.

[25] O’Keefe’s Life, vol. i. p. 101.

[26] London Scenes, by Aleph (1863), p. 75.

[27] Stow’s Annals.

[28] Hall’s Chronicle (condensed in Nichols’ London Pageants).

[29] Leland’s Collectanea, vol. iv. pp. 310 et seq.

[30] Holinshed.

[31] Nichols’ Progresses, vol. i. p. 58.

[32] Nichols’ London Pageants, p. 63.

[33] London Gazette.

[34] Nichols p. 83.

[35] Dugdale.

[36] Holinshed’s Chronicles, vol. iii. p. 338.

[37] Sharon Turner’s Hist. of England, vol. xii. p. 276.

[38] Hygford’s Exam. Murd., 57.

[39] Ibid.

[40] Pennant.

[41] Camden, p. 632.

[42] Hepworth Dixon’s Story of Lord Bacon’s Life (1862), p. 120.

[43] Hepworth Dixon’s Story of Lord Bacon’s Life (1862), p. 121.

[44] Wotton, Reliquiæ, p. 160.

[45] Dr. Birch’s Memoirs of the Reign of James I.

[46] Ben Jonson’s Works (Gifford), vol. vii. p. 75.

[47] Clarendon’s History of the Rebellion, x. 80.

[48] MS. Journal of the House of Commons.

[49] Smith’s Nollekens.

[50] Boswell’s Johnson (1860), p. 751.

[51] Jeaffreson’s Book about Doctors, p. 97.

[52] Boswell, vol. iv. p. 276.

[53] J. T. Smith’s Streets of London (1846), vol. i. p. 412.

[54] The Intelligencer, Jan. 23, 1664-5.

[55] Disraeli’s Curios. of Lit., p. 289.

[56] Evelyn, vol. i. p. 10.

[57] Dr. King’s Anecdotes, p. 117.

[58] Thoresby’s Diary, ii. 111-117.

[59] British Bibliographer, vol. i. p. 574.

[60] Pope’s Works (Carruthers), vol. ii. p. 379.

[61] Hawkins’s Life of Johnson, pp. 207-244.

[62] Jeaffreson’s Book about Doctors (2d edit.) pp. 207, 208.

[63] Stow, p. 161.

[64] Dryden’s Misc. Poems, iv. 275, ed. 1727 (Cunningham).

[65] Latimer’s Fourth Sermon, 1st ed.

[66] Strype, B. iv. p. 105.

[67] Earl of Monmouth’s Mem., ed. 1759, p. 77.

[68] Lysons.

[69] Dr. Birch’s Mems. of the Peers of England.

[70] Lingard’s History of England.

[71] Hughson.

[72] Cunningham (1846), vol. i. p. 38.

[73] Walpole’s Anecdotes, vol. i. p. 292.

[74] Lilly On the Life and Death of King Charles I., p. 224.

[75] Walpole’s Anecdotes, ii. 153.

[76] Smith’s Streets, vol. i. p. 385.

[77] Thoresby’s Letters, ii. 329.

[78] Hawkins’s Life of Johnson, p. 208.

[79] Spectator, 329-335.

[80] Ireland’s Authentic Account, etc. (1796), i. p. 42.

[81] W. H. Ireland’s Vindication, p. 21.

[82] Ireland’s Vindication, p. 19.

[83] Boaden’s Life of Kemble, vol. ii. p. 172.

[84] Andrews’s History of British Journalism, vol. ii. p. 285.

[85] Strype, B. iv. p. 118.

[86] Walpole’s Anecdotes, vol. ii. p. 391.

[87] The Mourning Bride.

[88] It is doubtful whether it was not the duchess. (Wilson’s Life of Congreve, 8vo, 1730, i. p. 1 of Preface.)

[89] Cibber’s Lives of the Poets (1753).

[90] Stow, p. 165.

[91] Spectator, No. 454.

[92] Malachi Malagrowther’s Letters.

[93] Croker’s Boswell, vol. i. p. 475.

[94] Scott’s Dryden, vol. i. p. 388.

[95] Johnson’s Life of Dryden.

[96] Strype, B. ii. p. 508.

[97] Hume.

[98] Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 363.

[99] Mitford, v. 201.

[100] Cunningham, vol. ii. p. 756.

[101] Stow, p. 149.

[102] Burleigh’s Diary in Munden, p. 811.

[103] Wilson’s Life of James I.

[104] L’Estrange’s Life of Charles I.

[105] Certain Information, etc., No. 11, p. 87.

[106] Cunningham, vol. ii. p. 755.

[107] Essay by John D’Espagne.

[108] Ludlow’s Memoirs, vol. ii. p. 615.

[109] Pepys, 2d. edit. vol. i. p. 309.

[110] Pepys, vol. i. p. 357.

[111] Aubrey’s Lives and Letters.

[112] Stow, p. 1045, ed. 1631.

[113] Pepys’s Diary, vol. i. p. 16.

[114] Leigh Hunt’s Town, p. 166.

[115] Ibid. p. 168.

[116] Dryden’s Essay on Dramatick Poesy, 1668.

[117] Cunningham, vol. ii. p. 756.

[118] European Magazine (Mr. Moser).

[119] Smith’s Life of Nollekens, vol. ii. p. 205.

[120] Walpole’s Anecdotes, vol. i. p. 22 (Notes by Northcote and Mr. Wornum).

[121] Chalmers’s British Poets, vol. vii. p. 101 (Ode to the Royal Society).

[122] Cunningham, vol. i. p. 26.

[123] Ibid. p. 757.

[124] Ibid.

[125] Walpole’s Anecdotes, vol. i. p. 282.

[126] Galt’s Life of West, pt. ii. p. 25.

[127] Ibid. pp. 36-38.

[128] Strange’s Enquiry into the Rise and Establishment of the Royal Academy (1775).

[129] Pye’s Patronage of British Art, p. 134.

[130] The original thirty-six Academicians were—Benjamin West, Francesco Zuccarelli, Nathaniel Dance, Richard Wilson, George Michael Moser, Samuel Wale (a sign-painter), J. Baptist Cipriani, Jeremiah Meyer, Angelica Kauffmann, Charles Catton (a coach and sign painter), Francesco Bartolozzi, Francis Cotes, Edward Penny, George Barrett (Wilson’s rival), Paul Sandby, Richard Yeo, Mary Moser, Agostino Carlini, William Chambers (the architect of Somerset House), Joseph Wilton (the sculptor), Francis Milner Newton, Francis Hayman, John Baker, Mason Chamberlin, John Gwynn, Thomas Gainsborough, Dominick Serres, Peter Toms (a drapery painter for Reynolds, who finally committed suicide), Nathaniel Hone (who for his libel on Reynolds was expelled the Academy), Joshua Reynolds, John Richards, Thomas Sandby, George Dance, J. Tyler, William Hoare of Bath, and Johann Zoffani. In 1772 Edward Burch, Richard Cosway, Joseph Nollekens, and James Barry (expelled in 1797), made up the forty.—Wornum’s Preface to the Lectures on Painting.

[131] Pye’s Patronage of British Art, 1845, p. 136.

[132] Royal Academy Catalogues, Brit. Mus.

[133] Smith’s Nollekens, vol. i. p. 381.

[134] Life of Haydon, by Tom Taylor, vol. i. p. 30.

[135] Ibid. p. 20.

[136] Thornbury’s Life of Turner.

[137] O’Keefe’s Life vol. i. p. 386.

[138] Knowles’s Life of Fuseli, vol. i. p. 32.

[139] Irvine’s Life of Falconer.

[140] Smith’s Life of Nollekens, vol. ii. p. 129.

[141] Hatton, p. 785.

[142] Postman, No. 80.

[143] Life of Blake, by Gilchrist.

[144] Andrews’s History of Journalism, vol. ii. p. 85.

[145] Strype, B. iii. p. 196.

[146] Glover’s Life, p. 6.

[147] Dennis’s Letters, p. 196.

[148] Procter’s Life of Kean, vol. ii. p. 140.

[149] Dr. King’s Art of Cookery.

[150] Spectator, No. 9.

[151] Memoirs of the Kit-Cat Club, p. 6.

[152] Defoe’s Journal, vol. i. p. 287.

[153] Letters of Lady M. W. Montagu, edited by W. M. Thomas, Esq.

[154] Annual Obituary, vol. vii.

[155] Monthly Repository, by Leigh Hunt, 1836.

[156] Procter’s Life of Kean.

[157] The Temple Anecdotes (Groombridge), p. 50.

[158] Strype, B. iv. p. 120.

[159] Ibid.

[160] Dixon’s Bacon, p. 227.

[161] Appendix to the Tatler, vol. iv. p. 615.

[162] Smith’s Streets of London, vol. iv. p. 244.

[163] Egerton Papers, by Collier, p. 376.

[164] Strype, B. vi. p. 76.

[165] Cunningham, vol. i. p. 283.

[166] London Gazette, No. 897.

[167] Pepys, vol. i. p. 137, 4to ed.

[168] Horace Walpole.

[169] Otway.

[170] Spectator, No. 155.

[171] Tatler, No. 26.

[172] Nouvelle Biographie Univ., vol. xxxviii. p. 19.

[173] Ducatus Leodiensis, fol. 1715, p. 485.

[174] British Apollo (1740), ii. p. 376.

[175] Oldys’s Life of Raleigh, p. 145.

[176] Aubrey, vol. iii. p. 513.

[177] Gough’s British Topography, vol. i. p. 743.

[178] Walpole’s Mems. of George III., vol. iv. p. 173.

[179] Elmes’s Anecdotes, vol. iii.

[180] Cunningham, vol. i. p. 83.

[181] Boswell, vol. i. p. 225.

[182] Hone’s Everyday Book, vol. i. p. 237.

[183] Pye’s Patronage of British Art (1845), pp. 61, 62.

[184] Wine and Walnuts, vol. i. p. 161.

[185] Smith’s Nollekens, vol. i. p. 3.

[186] Ibid. vol. ii. p. 203.

[187] Haydon’s Life, vol. iii. p. 182.

[188] Book about Doctors, by J. C. Jeaffreson, p. 221.

[189] Archenholz, p. 109.

[190] Colman’s Random Records.

[191] See the Percy Society’s Publications.

[192] Rymer, iii. 926.

[193] Chaucer’s Works.

[194] Dugdale’s Baronetage, vol. 1. p. 789.

[195] Scala Chron., p. 175; Froissart, c. 161.

[196] Rymer, vi. 452.

[197] Froissart, lix.

[198] Walsingham, p. 248.

[199] Holinshed, vol. ii. p. 431.

[200] Shakspere incorrectly makes Jack Cade burn the Savoy. He has attributed to that Irish impostor the act of Wat Tyler, a far more patriotic man.

[201] Stow.

[202] Cowley’s Works, 10th edit. (Tonson), 1707, vol. ii. p. 587.

[203] Letter to Evelyn. Cowley’s Works (1707), vol. ii. p. 731.

[204] J. T. Smith’s Antiquarian Ramble in the Streets of London (1846), vol. i. p. 255.

[205] Baker’s Chronicle (1730), p. 625.

[206] Cunningham’s London (1849), vol. ii. p. 728.

[207] The Postman (1696), No. 180.

[208] Strype, B. iv. p. 107, ed. 1720.

[209] Hughson’s Walks through London, p. 207.

[210] Hughson’s Walks through London, p. 209.

[211] Dryden’s Works (1821 ed.), vol. ii. p. 105.

[212] Athenæ Ox. vol. ii. p. 1036.

[213] Cunningham (1849), vol. ii. p. 537.

[214] Wood’s Athen. Ox. ii. 396, ed. 1721.

[215] The Shepherd’s Hunting (1633).

[216] Macaulay’s History of England, vol. ii. chap. v.

[217] Buckingham’s Works (1704), p. 15.

[218] All the Year Round, May 12, 1860 (The Precinct).

[219] Andrews’s History of British Journalism, vol. ii. p. 83.

[220] Smiles’s Lives of the Engineers, vol. ii. p. 187.

[221] Smiles’s Lives of the Engineers, vol. ii. p. 186.

[222] Ibid., vol. ii. p. 93.

[223] Hepworth Dixon’s Story of Lord Bacon’s Life (1862), p. 14.

[224] Montagu, xii. 420, 432.

[225] Aubrey’s Lives, vol. ii. p. 224; Dixon’s Bacon, p. 315.

[226] Character of Lord Bacon.

[227] Dixon’s Story of Lord Bacon’s Life, p. 33 (1862). Pearce’s Inns of Court.

[228] Sir B. Gerbier.

[229] Bassompierre’s Embassy to England.

[230] Whitelocke, p. 167.

[231] Peacham’s Compleat Gentleman, ed. 1661, p. 108.

[232] Pepys, 6th June 1663.

[233] Dryden (Scott), vol. ix. p. 233.

[234] Pepys’s Diary. vol. i. p. 223.

[235] Evelyn’s Memoirs, vol. i. p. 530.

[236] Rate Books of St. Martin’s.

[237] Cole’s MSS., vol. xx. folio 220.

[238] Gilchrist’s Life of Etty, vol. i. p. 221.

[239] Barrow’s Life of Peter the Great, p. 90.

[240] Ballard’s Collection, Bodleian.

[241] Pennant.

[242] Strype, B. vi. p. 76.

[243] Cunningham, vol. i. pp. 402, 403.

[244] Rate-books of St. Martin’s.

[245] Memorials of Franklin, vol. i. p. 261.

[246] Smith’s Comic Misc. vol. ii. p. 186.

[247] Memoirs of James Smith, by Horace Smith, vol. i. p. 32.

[248] Memoirs of James Smith, by Horace Smith, vol. i. p. 54.

[249] Smith’s Nollekens, vol. i. p. 340.

[250] Ibid. vol. i. pt 302.

[251] Harl. MSS. 6850.

[252] Rate-books of St. Martin’s.

[253] Smith’s Book for a Rainy Day, pp. 281, 282.

[254] Cal. Rot. Patentium.

[255] Brayley’s Beauties of England and Wales, vol. x. part iv. p. 167.

[256] Father Hubbard’s Tale, 4to, 1604.—Middleton’s Works, vol. v. p. 573.

[257] Archer’s Vestiges of Old London (View of Crockford’s shop).

[258] Walpole’s Anecdotes, vol. iii. p. 911.

[259] Malcolm’s Londinum Rediviv. vol. iii. p. 397.

[260] Hughson’s Walks (1829).

[261] Boswell’s Life of Johnson, vol. i. p. 383.

[262] Boswell, vol. iii. p. 331.

[263] Censura Literaria, vol. i. p. 176.

[264] Spence’s Anecdotes.

[265] State Poems, vol. ii. p. 143 (“A Satyr on the Poets.”)

[266] Leigh Hunt’s Town (1857), p. 135.

[267] Hughson’s Walks, p. 184.

[268] Leigh Hunt’s Town (1859 ed.), p. 134.

[269] Strype, B. iv. p. 117.

[270] Boswell.

[271] Walpole’s Anecdotes (ed. Dallaway), vol. ii. p. 315.

[272] Leigh Hunt’s Town (1859), p. 145.

[273] Brayley’s Beauties of England and Wales, vol. x. part iv. p. 166.

[274] Malone’s Shakspere, vol. iii. p. 516.

[275] Nichols’s Hogarth, vol. ii. p. 70.

[276] Cunningham (1849), vol. i. p. 210.

[277] Hughson’s Walks through London, p. 188.

[278] Chalmers’s Biog. Dict. vol. v. p. 64.

[279] Boswell, ed. Croker, vol. ii. 201.

[280] Stow, p. 166.

[281] Sir G. Buc, in Howes (ed. 1631), p. 1075.

[282] Fitzstephen, circa, 1178: the quotation refers, however, more to the north of London.

[283] Tennyson.

[284] Malcolm’s London, vol. ii.

[285] Knox’s Elegant Extracts.

[286] Leigh Hunt’s Town, p. 146.

[287] Henry IV. second part, act iii. sc. 2.

[288] Prot. Dissenters’ Magazine, vol. vi.

[289] Smith’s Life of Nollekens, vol. i. 365.

[290] Cradock’s Memoirs, vol. iv. p. 166.

[291] Garrard to the Earl of Strafford, vol. i. p. 227.

[292] Citie’s Loyaltie Displayed, 4to, 1661.

[293] Pepys.

[294] Aubrey’s Anecdotes, vol. iii. p. 457.

[295] Malcolm’s Streets of London (1846), vol. i. p. 363.

[296] Parish Clerks’ Survey, p. 286.

[297] Cunningham’s Lives of the Painters, vol. iii. p. 292.

[298] Pope’s Dunciad.

[299] Addison’s Freeholder, No. 4.

[300] J. T. Smith’s Streets of London (1846), vol. i. pp. 366, 367.

[301] Sir G. Buc (Stow by Howes), p. 1075, ed. 1631.

[302] Roper’s Life of Sir Thomas More, by Singer, p. 52.

[303] Spectator No. 2, March 2, 1710-11.

[304] Cunningham, vol. ii. p. 606.

[305] Sir G. Buc, in Howes, p. 1076, ed. 1631.

[306] Trivia.

[307] Smith’s Streets of London, vol. i. p. 338.

[308] Hone’s Every-day Book, vol. i. p. 1300.

[309] Walpole’s Anecdotes of Painting, vol. ii. p. 612.

[310] No. 102.

[311] Pennant’s London (1813), p. 204.

[312] Spectator, No. 454.

[313] Spectator, No. 454.

[314] Andrews’s History of Journalism, vol. ii. p. 8.

[315] Brayley’s Theatres of London (1826), p. 40.

[316] Brayley, p. 42.

[317] Chetwood’s History of the Stage, p. 141.

[318] Spectator, No. 468.

[319] Ward’s Secret History of Clubs, ed. 1709.

[320] Victor.

[321] Edwards’s Anecdotes of Painting, p. 20.

[322] Wine and Walnuts, vol. i. p. 110.

[323] P. Cunningham.

[324] Dr. King’s Art of Cookery, humbly inscribed to the Beef-steak Club. (1709.)

[325] Leigh Hunt’s Town (1859), p. 191.

[326] Cunningham, vol. i. p. 297.

[327] Delaune.

[328] Strype, B. iv. p. 119.

[329] Leigh Hunt’s Town, ch. iv.

[330] Wine and Walnuts, vol. i. p. 281.

[331] Ibid. p. 269.

[332] Wine and Walnuts, vol. i. p. 276.

[333] Cunningham, p. 187.

[334] Whitelocke.

[335] Lockhart’s Life of Scott, vol. vi. p. 20.

[336] The Stage, by Alfred Bunn, vol. iii. p. 131.

[337] Life of Mathews, by Mrs. Mathews (abridged by Mr. Yates), p. 211.

[338] Life of Mathews, by Mrs. Mathews.

[339] Critical Essays (1807), p. 140.

[340] Hazlitt’s Criticisms of the English Stage, p. 98.

[341] Hazlitt’s Criticisms of the English Stage, p. 98.

[342] Cole’s Life of C. Kean, vol. ii. p. 260.

[343] Strype, B. vi. p. 93.

[344] Stow.

[345] Davies’s Life of Garrick, vol. x. p. 217.

[346] Strype, B. vi. p. 93.

[347] Cunningham’s London (1850), p. 219.

[348] Whyte’s Miscellanea Nova, p. 49.

[349] Cunningham, vol. ii. p. 597.—Rate-books of St. Martin’s.

[350] Walpole’s Anecdotes, vol. i. p. 248.

[351] Dixon’s Story of Lord Bacon’s Life, p. 204.

[352] English Causes Célèbres (edited by Craik), vol. i. p. 79.

[353] Memoirs of the Peers of James I., p. 240.

[354] Autobiography of Lord Herbert, p. 110

[355] Suckling’s Poems.

[356] Camden’s Annals of King James.

[357] Londinum Redivivum.

[358] Walpole to Montague, Feb. 2, 1762.

[359] Dix’s Life of Chatterton, p. 267.

[360] Foster’s Life of Goldsmith, p. 216.

[361] Irving’s Oliver Goldsmith (1850), p. 90.

[362] Dr. Waagen’s Treasures of Art, vol. i. p. 394.

[363] Walpole’s Anecdotes, vol. ii. p. 354.

[364] Walpole, vol. i. p. 277.

[365] The Famous Chronicle of King Edward I. (4to., 1593).

[366] Bosworth’s Anglo-Saxon Dictionary.

[367] Hamlet.

[368] Diversions of Purley.

[369] Peele’s Works (Dyce), vii. 575.

[370] Rymer, ii. 498.

[371] Heming, 590.

[372] Walpole, vol. i. p. 32.

[373] Gleanings from Westminster Abbey, 2d edition, p. 152 (W. Burges), Roxburghe Club.

[374] Lilly’s Observations.

[375] Carlyle’s Cromwell, vol. i. p. 99.

[376] State Trials, vol. v. pp. 1234-5.

[377] Narcissus Luttrell.

[378] Overseers’ Books (Cunningham, vol. i. p. 179).

[379] Harl. MSS. 7315.

[380] Carpenter (quoted by Walpole, Anecdotes, vol. ii. p. 395).

[381] Walpole’s Anecdotes, vol. ii. p. 394.

[382] Smith’s Streets of London, vol. i. p. 139.

[383] Archenholz, Tableau de l’Angleterre, vol. ii. p. 164, 1788.

[384] Burnet, vol. ii. p. 53, ed. 1823.

[385] Annual Register (1810).

[386] Cobbett’s State Trials, vol. xvii. p. 160.

[387] Archenholz, vol. i. p. 166.

[388] Daily Advertiser, 1731.

[389] Gentleman’s Magazine, vol. i.

[390] v. 85.

[391] Hogarth’s Works (Nicholls and Steevens), vol. i. p. 162.

[392] Smith’s London, vol. i. p. 141.

[393] Notes and Queries (vol. vi., 1858), p. 364.

[394] Dunciad, B. iv. 30.

[395] Pope’s Works (edited by R. Carruthers), vol. ii. p. 314.

[396] Stow, p. 167.

[397] Report, May 16, 1844.

[398] Smith’s London, vol. i. p. 133.

[399] Dr. Waagen, vol. i. p. 6.

[400] Waagen, vol. i. p. 322.

[401] Ibid. vol. i. p. 331.

[402] Cunningham, nearly always correct, says £10,000 (vol. ii. p. 577).

[403] Waagen, vol. ii. p. 329.

[404] Cunningham’s London, p. 428.

[405] Smith’s Streets of London, vol. i. p. 153.

[406] Rate-books of St. Martin’s (Cunningham).

[407] MSS., Birch, 4221, quoted in the notes of the Tatler.

[408] “Country Wife.”

[409] “The Scowrers.”

[410] State Poems.

[411] “The Hind and the Panther Transversed.”

[412] “The Relapse.”

[413] The Art of Cookery.

[414] Weekly Journal, Nov. 21, 1724.

[415] London Gazette, June 4, 1688.

[416] Dunciad, B. ii. v. 411.

[417] Flying Post, June 23, 1716.

[418] Pope’s Works (Carruthers), vol. ii. pp. 309, 310.

[419] Leigh Hunt’s Essays on the Theatres (1807), p. 64.

[420] Philips’s Life of Milton, p. 32, 12mo, 1694.

[421] Cunningham (1850), p. 107.

[422] Wine and Walnuts, vol. i. p. 163.

[423] Royal Guide to the London Charities, 1878-79.

[424] Life of Dr. John North.

[425] Whitelock, p. 470, ed. 1732.

[426] Burnet, vol. ii. p. 70, ed. 1823.

[427] Boswell (Croker), vol. iii. p. 213.

[428] Willis’s History of the See of Llandaff.

[429] Bartholomew Fair (Ben Jonson).

[430] Gifford’s Ben Jonson, iv. p. 430.

[431] Cunningham, vol. ii. p. 505.

[432] The World, Nov. 29, 1753.

[433] Robson: a Sketch (Hotten, 1864).

[434] Aubrey, iii. 415.

[435] “Treacherous Brothers,” 4to, 1696.

[436] St. James’s Chronicle, April 24, 1762.

[437] Ibid. May 26, 1761.

[438] Edwards’ Anecdotes, pp. 116, 117.

[439] Rate-books of St. Martin’s.

[440] Lord Orford’s Anecdotes of Painting.

[441] J. C. Jeaffreson’s Book about Doctors, p. 109.

[442] Ath. Ox. vol. ii.

[443] Gifford’s Ben Jonson, vol. ix. pp. 48, 63, 64.

[444] Aubrey’s Letters, vol. ii. p. 332.

[445] Recital in grant to the parish from King James I.

[446] Cunningham’s London (1849), vol. ii. p. 526.

[447] Burnet’s Own Times, vol. i. p. 327, ed. 1823.

[448] Allan Cunningham’s Lives, vol. iv. p. 290.

[449] Biog. Brit.

[450] Smith’s Life of Nollekens, vol. ii. p. 233.

[451] Smith’s Book for a Rainy Day, pp. 251, 252.

[452] Prologues to the Satires, v. 180.

[453] Dr. Johnson’s Life of Ambrose Philips.

[454] Smith’s Nollekens and his Times, vol. ii. p. 222.

[455] Cunningham (1850), p. 450.

[456] Smith’s Streets, vol. ii. p. 208.

[457] Smith, vol. ii. p. 97.

[458] Smith, p. 211.

[459] Ibid. vol. ii. p. 212.

[460] Smith, vol. ii. p. 224.

[461] Smith’s Streets of London, vol. ii. p. 226.

[462] Wine and Walnuts, vol. i. p. 178, a curious and amusing book, the truth in which is spoiled by an injudicious and eccentric mixture of fiction.

[463] Smith’s Nollekens, vol. i. pp. 93, 94.

[464] Ibid. vol. ii. p. 233.

[465] Smith’s Nollekens, vol. ii. p. 238.

[466] Ibid. p. 241.

[467] Smith’s Nollekens, vol. i. p. 143.

[468] Ibid. vol. ii. p. 244.

[469] Ibid. p. 250.

[470] Recollections of O’Keefe, vol. i. p. 108.

[471] Knowles’s Life of Fuseli, vol. i. p. 57.

[472] Passages of a Working Life, by Charles Knight, vol. i. pp. 114, 115.

[473] Hume’s Learned Societies, pp. 84, 85.

[474] Dr. Hodges’ Letter to a Person of Quality, p. 15.

[475] Defoe’s Journal of the Plague Year.

[476] Dr. Hodges’ Loimologia, p. 7 (from the reprint in 1720, when the plague was raging in France).

[477] Ibid. pp. 19, 20.

[478] Howes, p. 1048.

[479] Bagford, Harl. MSS. 5900, fol. 50.

[480] Walpole’s Royal and Noble Authors, vol. ii. p. 25.

[481] Evelyn’s Diary (1850), vol. ii. p. 59.

[482] Evelyn’s Diary, vol. ii. p. 153 (1850).

[483] Life of Lord Herbert (1826), p. 304.

[484] Horace Walpole.

[485] Aubrey’s Lives, vol. ii. p. 387.

[486] Walpole’s Anecdotes of Painting (Dallaway), vol. ii. p. 593.

[487] Richardson.

[488] Walpole, vol. ii. p. 563 (partly from Dallaway’s version of the same story).

[489] Dallaway.

[490] Walpole, vol. ii. p. 594.

[491] Spence.

[492] Aubrey, vol. ii p. 132.

[493] Dallaway’s Notes.

[494] Clarendon, B. ii. p. 2117.

[495] Ibid. B. i. p. 116.

[496] Clarendon, B. viii. p. 694.

[497] Walpole’s Anecdotes of Painting, vol. ii. p. 452.

[498] Doran’s Her Majesty’s Servants, vol. ii. p. 51.

[499] Leigh Hunt’s Town, p. 226.

[500] Ibid. p. 226.

[501] Hazlitt’s Criticisms of the English Stage, p. 49.

[502] O’Keefe’s Life, vol. i. p. 322.

[503] Leigh Hunt, p. 226.

[504] Life of Benjamin Franklin (1826), p. 31.

[505] Life of the Duke of Ormond (1747), pp. 67, 80.

[506] Macaulay, vol. ii. p. 560.

[507] Bramston, p. 339.

[508] Annual Register (1780), pp. 254-287.

[509] Life of Inigo Jones, by P. Cunningham, p. 22 (Shakspere Society).

[510] Smith’s Nollekens, vol. ii. p. 90.

[511] Cibber’s Lives, vol. ii. p. 10.

[512] Ibid. p. 11.

[513] Cunningham’s London, vol. ii. p. 501.

[514] Dryden’s Works (Scott), vol. i. p. 204.

[515] Scott’s Dryden, vol. xiii. p. 7.

[516] Cibber’s Lives, vol. iv. p. 293.

[517] Wine and Walnuts, vol. ii. p. 277.

[518] Cibber’s Lives, vol. iv. p. 47.

[519] Cibber’s Lives, vol. iv. p. 47.

[520] Mrs. Bray’s Life of Stothard, p. 47.

[521] Defoe’s Journey through England.

[522] Wine and Walnuts, vol. ii. p. 167.

[523] Smith’s Nollekens, vol. i. p. 27.

[524] Times, Sept. 26, 1796.

[525] Talfourd’s Final Memorials of Charles Lamb, vol. i. p. 56.

[526] Burke’s Landed Gentry (1858), p. 320.

[527] Pennant.

[528] Lingard, vol. vi. p. 607.

[529] Walton’s Lives (1852), p. 22.

[530] Angel in the House, by Mr. Coventry Patmore.

[531] Dedication to Translation of Juvenal.

[532] Donne’s Poems (1719), p. 291.

[533] Miss Benger’s Memoirs of the Queen of Bohemia, vol. ii. p. 322.

[534] Miss Benger’s Memoirs of the Queen of Bohemia, vol. ii. p. 428.

[535] Sydney State Papers, vol. ii. p. 723.

[536] Benger, vol. ii. p. 457.

[537] Ibid., Preface.

[538] Brayley’s Londiniana, vol. iv. p. 301.

[539] Walpole’s Anecdotes, p. 210.

[540] Cunningham, vol. i. p. 204.

[541] Wilson’s Life of James I. (1653), p. 146.

[542] Aubrey’s Anecdotes and Traditions, p. 3.

[543] Trivia.

[544] Rate-books of St. Martin’s, quoted by P. Cunningham.

[545] Granger’s Biographical History of England (1824), vol. v. p. 356.

[546] Pepys’s Memoirs, vol. iii. p. 75.

[547] Curll’s History of the English Stage, vol. i. p. III.

[548] Miscellaneous Works by the late Duke of Buckingham, etc., p. 35 (1704).

[549] Miscellaneous Works by the late Duke of Buckingham, etc., vol. i. p. 34.

[550] Burnet’s History of his own Times (1753), vol. i. p. 387.

[551] Leigh Hunt’s Town (1859), p. 282.

[552] Evelyn’s Mems. vol. ii. p. 339.

[553] Collier, iii. 328.

[554] Prynne’s Histrio-Mastix (1633).

[555] Pepys (May 8, 1663).

[556] Cibber’s Apology, p. 338. ed. 1740.

[557] Doran, vol. i. p. 57.

[558] Dec. 7, 1666.

[559] Jan. 23, 1667.

[560] April 20, 1667.

[561] Doran, p. 97.

[562] Doran, vol. i. p. 79.

[563] Leigh Hunt, p. 267.

[564] Cibber’s Apology, 250.

[565] Doran, vol. i. p. 466.

[566] Tatler, No. 182.

[567] Doran, vol. i. p. 464.

[568] Cumberland’s Memoirs, p. 59.

[569] Davies’s Miscellanies, vol. i. p. 126.

[570] Doran, vol. ii. p. 126.

[571] Ibid. p. 149.

[572] Doran, vol. i. p. 511.

[573] Ibid. vol. ii. p. 7.

[574] Dr. Doran, vol. ii. p. 277.

[575] Dr. Doran’s Knights and their Days.

[576] Elia, p. 217.

[577] Doran, vol. ii. p. 330.

[578] Leigh Hunt’s Essays on the Theatres, p. 124.

[579] Hazlitt’s Essays, p. 47.

[580] Elia, p. 216.

[581] Moore’s Sheridan, p. 140.

[582] Ibid. p. 181.

[583] Murphy’s Garrick.

[584] Doran, vol. ii. p. 489.

[585] Leigh Hunt’s Essays on the Theatres, p. 124.

[586] Ibid. p. 78.

[587] Hazlitt’s Criticisms of the Stage, p. 441.

[588] Elia, p. 221.

[589] Doran, vol. ii. p. 476.

[590] Hazlitt’s Essays, p. 47.

[591] Hazlitt’s Criticisms, pp. 49, 50.

[592] Elia (1853), p. 206.

[593] Elia, p. 232.

[594] Ibid. p. 213.

[595] Moore’s Life of Sheridan, p. 637.

[596] Moore’s Sheridan, p. 637.

[597] Smith’s Nollekens, vol. ii. p. 113.

[598] Hazlitt’s Essays, p. 51.

[599] Ibid. p. 212.

[600] The Georgian Era, vol. iv. p. 43.

[601] Hazlitt’s Essays, p. 49.

[602] Lounger’s Commonplace Book, vol. ii. p. 137.

[603] Dunciad, B. iii. p. 199.

[604] Lounger’s Commonplace Book, vol. ii. p. 141.

[605] The Intelligencer, No. 3.

[606] Leigh Hunt’s Town, p. 248.

[607] Fly Leaves (Miller), vol. i. p. 96.

[608] Disraeli’s Miscellanies, p. 77.

[609] Wine and Walnuts, vol. ii. p. 150.

[610] Jeaffreson’s Book about Doctors (2d ed.), p. 85.

[611] The very earliest was granted to Philip the Hermit, for gravelling the road at Highgate.

[612] Rymer’s Fœdera.

[613] Fuller’s Church History.

[614] Vaughan’s Life of Wickliffe.

[615] Dobie’s St. Giles’s, p. 11.

[616] Ibid. (1829), p. 2.

[617] Pennant (4th ed.), p. 3.

[618] Butler’s Lives of the Saints.

[619] Aggas’s Map, published in 1578 or 1560.

[620] Stow’s Survey, 1595.

[621] Dobie’s St. Giles’s, p. 46.

[622] Evelyn’s Diary.

[623] Brayley’s Londiniana.

[624] Dobie’s St. Giles’s, pp. 58, 59.

[625] Defoe’s History of the Plague.

[626] Maitland’s History of London.

[627] Dr. Sydenham.

[628] Dr. Hodgson’s Journal of the Plague.

[629] Dr. Hodges on the Plague.

[630] Fuller’s Church History.

[631] Hume.

[632] Fuller.

[633] Parliamentary Report.

[634] Ralph.

[635] Rowland Dobie’s History of St. Giles’s, p. 119.

[636] Pennant’s London, p. 159.

[637] Cunningham’s London, vol. i. p. 339.

[638] Annual Register, 1827.

[639] Dobie’s St. Giles’s, p. 367.

[640] Strype.

[641] Strype.

[642] Dobie’s St. Giles’s, p. 225.

[643] Cunningham’s London, vol. i. p. 384.

[644] Smith’s Book for a Rainy Day, p. 21.

[645] Stow, p. 164.

[646] Pennant.

[647] Smith’s Book for a Rainy Day, p. 29, date 1774.

[648] Smith’s Book for a Rainy Day is one of the best works of a clever London antiquarian, to whose industry, as well as to Mr. Peter Cunningham’s, the author is much indebted, as his foot-notes pretty well show.

[649] Dryden’s Limberham.

[650] Love for Love.

[651] Stow.

[652] Dobie’s St. Giles’s, p. 66.

[653] Parton’s account of St. Giles’s.

[654] Parton.

[655] Smith’s Nollekens, vol. i. p. 130.

[656] Archenholz, p. 117.

[657] Smith’s Book for a Rainy Day, p. 74.

[658] Dobie’s History of St. Giles’s, p. 204.

[659] Bell’s Life in London, July 12, 1829.

[660] Cunningham, vol. ii. p. 565.

[661] Cunningham, vol. ii. p. 566.

[662] Sketches by Boz, p. 44.

[663] Sketches by Boz, p. 45.

[664] Dobie’s St. Giles’s, p. 362.

[665] T. Hudson Turner, Archæological Journal, Dec. 1848.

[666] Sir G. Buc in Stow, by Howes, p. 1072 (ed. 1631).

[667] Pennant, p. 176.

[668] Cunningham, vol. ii. p. 480.

[669] Walpole, by Dallaway, vol. ii. p. 37.

[670] Lloyd’s State Worthies.

[671] State Trials, iv. 445, fol. ed.

[672] Hudibras, part iii. c. 3.

[673] Granger’s Biography in art. “Margaret Roper.”

[674] Dr. Birch’s Life of Tillotson.

[675] Hale’s Life, by Burnet.

[676] Biog. Brit., by the Hon. and Rev. F. Egerton.

[677] Preface to Thurloe’s State Papers, 1742.

[678] Biog. Brit.

[679] Session of the Poets.

[680] Johnson’s Lives.

[681] Ath. Ox. vol. ii.

[682] Foote’s Life of Murphy.

[683] Campbell’s Lives of the Chief Justices, vol. iii. p. 221.

[684] Dr. Johnson.

[685] Pennant, p. 176.

[686] Evelyn’s Diary, vol. ii. p. 60 (1850).

[687] The Devil is an Ass.

[688] Aubrey.

[689] Gifford’s Ben Jonson, vol. i. p. 9.

[690] Fuller’s Worthies, vol. ii. p. 112.

[691] Gifford, vol. i. p. 14.

[692] Moore’s Memoirs, vol. ii. p. 211.

[693] Poems on Affairs of State, vol. i. p. 147.

[694] Cunningham.

[695] Rymer’s Fœdera, vol. xvii. p. 120.

[696] Wilkinson’s Handbook for Egypt, p. 185.

[697] Cunningham’s Life of Inigo Jones, p. 23 (Shakspere Society).

[698] Canting Academy, 1674 (Malcolm).

[699] Cunningham.

[700] Rate-books of St. Clement’s Danes (Cunningham).

[701] Wharton’s Works.

[702] Life of Lord W. Russell, by Lord John Russell, 3d ed. vol. ii. p. 18.

[703] Fox’s History of the Reign of James II. (Introduction).

[704] Lord John Russell, vol. i. p. 121.

[705] Raplin, vol. xiv. p. 333.

[706] Burnet’s History of his own Times (1725), vol. ii.

[707] Letters of Lady Russell, 7th ed. 1819.

[708] State Trials, vol. xviii. p. 522.

[709] Daily Journal, July 9, 1735.

[710] Ireland Inns of Court, p. 129.

[711] Macaulay’s History of England, vol. i. p. 353.

[712] Walpole’s Anecdotes, vol. iii. p. 167.

[713] Pennant, p. 238.

[714] Lady M. W. Montague’s Letters.

[715] Burney’s Hist. of Music, vol. iv. p. 667.

[716] Lord Chesterfield (Mahon), vol. ii. p. 264.

[717] Hawkins’s Life of Johnson, p. 192.

[718] Pugh’s Life of Jonas Hanway (1787), p. 184.

[719] Lounger’s Commonplace Book, vol. i. p. 361.

[720] Macaulay’s Essay on Walpole’s Letters.

[721] Walpole’s Memoirs, vol. i. p. 169.

[722] Campbell’s Lives of the Lord Chancellors, vol. vi. p. 105.

[723] Campbell’s Chief Justices, vol. ii. p. 563.

[724] Pepys, vol. ii. p. 272.

[725] Ibid. p. 282.

[726] Hatton’s New View of London (1708), p. 627.

[727] Clarendon, vol. vi. pp. 89, 90.

[728] Grosley’s Tour to London, vol. ii. p. 309.

[729] Walpole’s Letters, vol. ii. p. 137.

[730] Walpole’s Letters, vol. vii. p. 223.

[731] Ibid. vol. ix. p. 307.

[732] Cunningham, vol. i. p. 228.

[733] Lady Fanshawe’s Memoirs, p. 92.

[734] Ibid. p. 94.

[735] Lady Fanshawe’s Memoirs, pp. 300, 301.

[736] Moore’s Diary, vol. iv. p. 193.

[737] Ibid. p. 35.

[738] Coleridge’s Table Talk.

[739] Townsend, vol. i. p. 91.

[740] “The Alabaster sarcophagus of Oimeneptah I., King of Egypt, now in Sir John Soane’s Museum. Drawn by Joseph Bonomi, and described by Samuel Sharpe.” London: Longmans and Co. 1864.

[741] Annual Register (1837).

[742] Chapone’s Letters, vol. ii. p. 68.

[743] Leigh Hunt’s Town, p. 237.

[744] Malone, pp. 135, 136.

[745] Grammont’s Mems. (1811), vol. ii. p. 142.

[746] Doran’s Her Majesty’s Servants, vol. i. p. 80.

[747] Pepys, vol. iii. p. 136.

[748] Pepys, vol. iv. p. 2.

[749] Cibber’s Apology, chap. v.

[750] Ibid.

[751] Doran, vol. i. p. 119.

[752] Doran, vol. i. p. 149.

[753] Leigh Hunt’s Town, p. 245.

[754] Cibber’s Apology, 2d. ed. p. 138.

[755] Baker’s Biog. Dram., vol. i. p. 270.

[756] Doran, vol. i. p. 542.

[757] Doran, vol. i. p. 424.

[758] Ibid. p. 446.

[759] Leigh Hunt’s Town, p. 427.

[760] Cunningham (1850), p. 406.

[761] Doran, vol. i. p. 327.

[762] Whincop’s Scanderberg, p. 80 (1747).

[763] Fly Leaves, by John Miller, p. 20.

[764] The name of Strahan, Paul, and Bates’s firm was originally Snow and Walton. It was one of the oldest banking-houses in London, second only to Child’s. At the period of the Commonwealth Snow and Co. carried on the business of pawnbrokers, under the sign of the “Golden Anchor.” The firm suspended payment about 1679 (as did many other banks), owing to the tyranny of Charles II. Strahan (the partner at the time of the last failure) had changed his name from Snow; his uncle, named Strahan (Queen’s printer?) having left him £180,000, making change of name a condition. It is curious that on examining Strahan and Co.’s books, it was found by those of 1672 that a decimal system had been then employed. Strahan was known to all religious people. Bates had for many years been managing clerk. The firm had also a navy agency in Norfolk Street. They had encumbered themselves with the Mostyn Collieries to the amount of £139,940, and backed up Gandells, contractors who were making railways in France and Italy and draining Lake Capestang, lending £300,000 or £400,000. They finally pledged securities (£22,000) to the Rev. Dr. Griffiths, Prebendary of Rochester. Sir John Dean Paul got into a second-class carriage at Reigate, the functionaries trying to get in after him; the porter pulled them back, the train being in motion! Paul went to London alone, and in spite of telegraph got off, but at eight o’clock next night surrendered. The three men were tried October 26 and 27, 1858.

[765] Mrs. Lirriper’s Lodgings (1863), pp. 6, 7.

[766] Harleian MS., 6850.

[767] Cunningham, vol. i. p. 378. I may here, as well as anywhere else, express my thanks to this careful and most industrious antiquary.

[768] Mrs. Cornwall Baron Wilson’s Memoirs of the Duchess of St. Albans (1840), vol. i. p. 331.

[769] Kippis, Bio. Brit. iv. p. 266.

[770] Thornbury’s British Artists, vol. i. p. 171.

[771] Gentleman’s Magazine, August 1783, p. 709.

[772] David Copperfield (1864), p. 208.

[773] The Clubs of London, vol. ii. p. 150.

[774] The Clubs of London (1828), vol. ii.

[775] Notes and Queries, vol. vi. 2d series, p. 131.

[776] Hatten, p. 24.

[777] Cunningham, vol. i. p. 378.

[778] Notes and Queries (Bolton Corney), vol. viii. 2d series, p. 122.

[779] Burnet, vol. i. p. 338.

[780] Pepys, vol. v. p. 436.

[781] Pennant, p. 215.

[782] Trivia.

[783] Anecdotes of Painting, iv. 22.

[784] Malone’s Dryden, ii. 97.

[785] Mr. Rimbault in Notes and Queries, Feb. 1850.

[786] Clubs of London, vol. ii. p. 263.

[787] All from Cunningham, vol. ii. p. 731, and how much else.

[788] Notes and Queries, 2d series, vol. xi. p. 289.

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